Book goes on scenic journey along A149

A149 Landmarks by Edward Couzens-Lake. Printed by Amberley Publishing.
A149 Landmarks by Edward Couzens-Lake. Printed by Amberley Publishing.

If you have ever travelled in West Norfolk, there is a good chance that you are well-versed on the ins and outs of the A149.

But what is questionable is how often people taking this route stop and admire the abundance of landmarks along the way.

Holkham Hall. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

Holkham Hall. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

One author, originally from Brancaster, has done just that by cataloguing the stand-out monuments along the A149.

Edwards Couzens-Lake’s A149 Landmarks, published by Amberley Books, starts its journey in Lynn, and winds its way through Hunstanton and Holkham, and then on to North and East Norfolk.

Each landmark is accompanied by a short, concise description of its origins, history and significance, as well as a photograph.

The book begins at the South Gates, described by Couzens-Lake as an “impressive gateway to the old southern entry point” to Lynn, which is included despite not being on the A149 due to its “historical significance”.

Hunstanton Lighthouse and Remains of St Edmunds Chapel. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

Hunstanton Lighthouse and Remains of St Edmunds Chapel. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

The work encompasses Lynn’s Queen Elizabeth Hospital, church ruins, an old telephone kiosk, a windmill and a whole host of other features within the West Norfolk boundary.

In describing one of the interests based on the Sandringham Estate, Couzens-Lake says: “The intriguingly named Cat’s Bottom, situated within the estate margins, is an area of conifer woodland that also consists of a few cottages built, it is thought, for workers at the estate’s gravel pits.

“It has, perhaps with the intention of soothing the sensitivities of those who might be easily offended, found itself called ‘Catchbottom’ in recent years, but this would seem to be nothing more than latter-day censorship as the location is always marked as Cat’s Bottom on old maps.”

The 96-page work acts as a travel companion to those visiting and exploring Norfolk, but also as an informative tool to those who may be intrigued to find out more about their home county.

Ruins of Church of St James at Bawsey, near King's Lynn. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

Ruins of Church of St James at Bawsey, near King's Lynn. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

- A149 Landmarks, published by Amberley Books, is available now with an RRP of £14.99.

Holkham Hall. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

Holkham Hall. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

Brancaster Old Millstone. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

Brancaster Old Millstone. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

Heacham Village Sign. Photo: Mark Oakden.

Heacham Village Sign. Photo: Mark Oakden.

Ruins of St Felix Church, Babingley. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

Ruins of St Felix Church, Babingley. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

Hunstanton Redgate Water Tower. Photo: Nigel Nudds.

Hunstanton Redgate Water Tower. Photo: Nigel Nudds.