King’s Lynn firm steps up exports with further order from Jamaica

The installaion of equipment from Gurney Environmental in Jamaica
The installaion of equipment from Gurney Environmental in Jamaica

Lynn’s Gurney Environmental is stepping up its overseas exports having just won a second order from Jamaica for its equipment now in demand the world over.

Following the successful use of its wastewater treatment equipment in Jamaica, Gurney Environmental, based in Bryggen Road, North Lynn Industrial Estate, has won a further order.

The firm has already supplied its Accel-o-Fac® wastewater treatment at the Harbour View plant, which is owned and operated by the Jamaican National Water Commission. Now it has been asked to supply and install the first phase of an Accel-o-Fac upgrade for the Greater Portmore wastewater treatment plant.

This is due to take place later this year and follows the recent installation of the same upgrade system in New Zealand for the Nelson City Council at their Bell Island plant earlier this year.

This newest order underlines Gurney Environmental’s commitment to developing its overseas exports as well as the growing acceptance of the company’s highly sustainable wastewater treatment technology worldwide.

The Greater Portmore Accel-o-Fac® wastewater treatment upgrade option was chosen by the Jamaican NWC based on its sustainability and its ability to improve the wastewater treatment process in both primary and secondary lagoons. The system enables operators to extend the life of their existing wastewater treatment assets.

The Accel-o-Fac® system is advanced technology that can be used as a new-build design or to upgrade existing lagoon based systems. It disinfects and eliminates odours and sludge.

The installation of the Greater Portmore treatment upgrade will improve the load capacity of wastewater treatment infrastructure in the Kingstown area and will enhance treatment capacity at the plant in response to the development of new homes in the area.

The Accel-o-Fac system uses wind power as its primary energy source, so it doesn’t have to rely on electricity — which can be intermittent in some parts of Jamaica.