St Edmund’s Academy pupils to play a role in history of Port of Lynn

Pupils from St Edmunds school pupils visit the ABP Port in King's Lynn to get inspiration for a competition to name the new warehouse being built - John Jarvis and Paul Brooks (front right) with pupils on the visit.
Pupils from St Edmunds school pupils visit the ABP Port in King's Lynn to get inspiration for a competition to name the new warehouse being built - John Jarvis and Paul Brooks (front right) with pupils on the visit.

Youngsters from St Edmund’s Academy were yesterday invited to play an important part in the history of the Port of Lynn.

Twenty seven Year 5 pupils from the Lynn school in nearby Kilhams Way were asked to take part in a competition to name the new bulk warehouse which is due for completion in July.

They were given their challenge after an educational tour around the port and a presentation which included a timeline list of historic events in the town.

The winning name will be revealed at the official opening ceremony of the new £2.2 million facility due to take place in August.

Said port manager Paul Brooks: “We are looking for the children to come up with a name for our store which relates to Lynn and its history.

“We are asking them to go away and come up with ideas, but before their summer break, we would like them to come back to us with their chosen names.

“When they return to school after the holidays and we have the new signs in place, we will ask them to come back and see the completed store.

“The school has been very supportive of the port and our aim is to have good engagement with the local community.”

The bulk store is part of a recent £3.3 million investment made by Associated British Ports at the Lynn port this year. It measures externally 3,500 square metres and has solar panels on the roof,

In March a £1.1 million state-of-the art new hydraulic crane was unveiled which has significantly improved cargo-handling capabilities.

Both the bulk store and the crane are part of ABP’s broader £1 billion commitment to investment across 21 ports.

The store has been designed to have four bays, each with the capacity to store 4,000 tonnes of grain.

Said Paul: “As 4,000 tonnes is whatwe would load onto a ship, having it already measured makes loading more efficient.”