Dash of colour for Downham Market school’s Children In Need fundraiser

Students at Downham Market Academy (DMA) completing a colour run for Children In Need. Picture: CWA. ANL-161121-110441001
Students at Downham Market Academy (DMA) completing a colour run for Children In Need. Picture: CWA. ANL-161121-110441001

It was a colourful day for students and staff at Downham Market Academy (DMA) who fundraised for BBC Children In Need in a unique way.

On Friday, more than 150 pupils stayed after school to take part in a colour run, and were pelted with bright paints, to raise charity funds.

Students at Downham Market Academy (DMA) completing a colour run for Children In Need. Picture: CWA. ANL-161121-110502001

Students at Downham Market Academy (DMA) completing a colour run for Children In Need. Picture: CWA. ANL-161121-110502001

There were also stalls selling merchandise and refreshments to collect further donations.

Head of house Karen Stewardson said the colour run had been a huge success, and was already looking to hold similar events in the future.

She said: “We had a fantastic event. 160 children stayed after school to take part in the colour run, supported by lots of staff who threw paint and even more who took part in the run with the students.

“We were also supported by lots of parents who came to watch. The idea for the event came from the student leadership team back in September and the whole event has been brilliantly supported. I have already been asked when the next one is.”

Students at Downham Market Academy (DMA) completing a colour run for Children In Need. Picture: CWA. ANL-161121-110452001

Students at Downham Market Academy (DMA) completing a colour run for Children In Need. Picture: CWA. ANL-161121-110452001

The colour run was not the only fundraising initiative at the school, however, with a number of students holding a coffee morning in Downham Town Hall.

Pupils sold homemade cakes and hot drinks to members of the public in an effort to raise money for youngsters in need in the UK.

The coffee morning raised around £300 for the charity appeal, after which one student said: “Not only has this been a really worthwhile event for Children In Need, it’s also been really good to talk to people from Downham and show them that teenagers are actually really nice people, unlike how we sometimes get portrayed in the media.”

Nigel Brunn, a member of the public who attended the event, said: “The work that the students do for the community is absolutely fantastic. It’s restored my faith in the young people around here.

Students at Downham Market Academy (DMA) ran a public coffee morning in the town hall with cakes made by staff and students. Picture: CWA. ANL-161121-112250001

Students at Downham Market Academy (DMA) ran a public coffee morning in the town hall with cakes made by staff and students. Picture: CWA. ANL-161121-112250001

“The work they’ve done previously on the town’s memorial garden and the effort they’ve made with this coffee morning is a credit to the town and the academy.”

The fundraising didn’t stop there though, as a Key Stage 3 cinema was held at lunchtime, donations for which were collected in the school hall.

The academy raised more than £1,100 for Children In Need and still has a raffle running which will add to its total.

At the sixth form site of the academy, students did their bit by turning up in fancy dress to fundraise.

Children In Need - Downham Market Academy Sixth Form students in fancy dress. LtoR - Luke Ball, Holly Cowper, Becca Field, Ryan Cleasby, Olivia White. ANL-161120-211753009

Children In Need - Downham Market Academy Sixth Form students in fancy dress. LtoR - Luke Ball, Holly Cowper, Becca Field, Ryan Cleasby, Olivia White. ANL-161120-211753009

From Teletubbies to a minion, and Grease to Mary Poppins, pupils took on an array of characters for charity.

Nationally on BBC TV the annual appeal raised a record £46.6 million for disadvantaged children and young people in the UK.

The night also saw tributes paid to the late Sir Terry Wogan who hosted the event for 35 years.