Hospice set to benefit from weekend exhibition at Heacham venue

Heacham art and craft day for Norfolk Hospice
From left - Tapping House volunteer, Val Smith, and art group members  Stella Langley, Julie and Geoff Symons and Charley Poole tour the exhibition
Heacham art and craft day for Norfolk Hospice From left - Tapping House volunteer, Val Smith, and art group members Stella Langley, Julie and Geoff Symons and Charley Poole tour the exhibition

The importance of supporting research into cancer was brought into sharp focus during the second annual arts and crafts exhibition in Heacham’s Old Friends Hall at the weekend.

One stallholder, Lynn Hallifax, is currently raising money for Addenbrooke’s University Hospital, Cambridge, where her granddaughter is being treated for leukaemia.

And, although she has now been told she has cancer again, it has not altered her resolve.

She said: “I’m doing it in gratitude for Addenbrooke’s support. I started raising money in May and I’m planning to continue for a year. So far I’ve raised around £1,000.”

The main charitable aim of the exhibition itself, organised by Stella Langley and David Oakland, was to raise funds for the Norfolk Hospice, Tapping House.

The show was hosted by the Friends Art Group, originally a six strong dedicated group of aspiring oil-painters, who have all been taught to use oils by Mr Oakland who started the group two years ago.

Now it is nineteen-strong with a waiting list. The work of all members was on show and the group invited 11 local craftspersons to also display their wares.

Stella Langley said the event had been a great success.

She added: “We have had a constant flow of visitors and we are very pleased with the result.”

Val Smith, part of the hospice’s fund-raising department, was among the stallholders with her range of repaired up-cycled jewellery.

Another stall was run by Xenoula Eleftheriades, who founded a charity, Xen Arts, in 2008 that supports young people in Zimbabwe with projects such as an educational programme for street children, a home for abused young women and their babies and a programme of the creative arts.

She said that, among their initiatives, they provide dance training as a means of giving these young people something positive to engage in to prevent them turning to drugs, alcohol and crime.