Hunstanton Round Table helps to honour Tiny Treasures

THERESA'S TINY TREASURES 
Theresa McGrath (left) with her new laptop.  In the background in front of the Round Tablers, from left, Neil Wells, Gary Waddison, Robert Brown, Andrew Bingham and Joe Bates, are some of the mementoes she makes
THERESA'S TINY TREASURES Theresa McGrath (left) with her new laptop. In the background in front of the Round Tablers, from left, Neil Wells, Gary Waddison, Robert Brown, Andrew Bingham and Joe Bates, are some of the mementoes she makes

A charity’s work to help bereaved parents come to terms with the loss of a child has been backed by the Hunstanton and District Round Table.

The group presented Theresa McGrath, who founded Theresa’s Tiny Treasures in October 2015, with a top of the range laptop computer, plus an enhanced graphics card, at the town’s Sailing Club on Saturday.

After working at the King’s Lynn Queen Elizabeth hospital for 30 years, Theresa had seen countless times not only the joys but also the heartaches of childbirth.

She understood only too well the distress and anguish that was caused when an expected new baby did not survive as was the case with many premature babies.

To help parents cope with their bereavement she started Tiny Treasures in October 2015 and achieved charitable status eleven months later.

She said: “The laptop will be a great help. I can edit photographs of the babies, remove blemishes for parents. I’ve had requests from all over the world.”

But that is only one way she provides a tangible memory of child that will never see adulthood.

She also makes casts in ceramics and glass of tiny feet and hands. One, of a premature child only 20 weeks old is a beautiful keepsake though only an inch long. She also makes other mementos such as stars in glass and metal as well as small charms.

Her work has already garnered a lot of support from the public.

Theresa said: “I’ve got my own kiln for my ceramics. It came from Christine and Nigel Fletcher who lost their son, Jacob, at 38 weeks.

“James and Christina Shulder also raised £3,000 to help me get a lot of my initial equipment.”

The Round Tablers said that they were always open to charity requests from people of all ages across Hunstanton and the immediate area.

One special framed and personal item Theresa crafted recently, illustrated with a butterfly motif made up of pearl buttons and a heart, brings back especially personal memories. It remembers her twin brother who did not survive birth 50 years ago. Nameless at the time, and with the agreement of her mother, he is now called Patrick.