Iconic North End images restored to glory

Unveiling of the Grand Sign at True�"s Yard by Sir Jeremy Bagge.
Sir Jeremy Bagge and Dr Paul Richards with the sign now in place after renovation ANL-160606-082048009

Unveiling of the Grand Sign at True�"s Yard by Sir Jeremy Bagge. Sir Jeremy Bagge and Dr Paul Richards with the sign now in place after renovation ANL-160606-082048009

Two iconic images in Lynn’s North End were restored to their former glory at a double unveiling on Friday.

The ‘grand sign’ outside the fisherfolk museum in True’s Yard has returned to its rightful place, while a new green plaque has been installed on the former Retreat building on Hextable Road.

They were both unveiled by Sir Jeremy Bagge.

Town historian Dr Paul Richards said: “Friday was a real fillet for the North End cultural story in what is our silver jubilee year.

“The True’s Yard sign is situated on the East Wall of the museum and it captures everyone coming into town from that direction.

“It is a work of art in its own right and enhances the street scene and the town itself.

“It calls people to our museum and it’s a call to our rich heritage. We are so pleased to have it back.”

The bulk of the True’s Yard sign was paid for by the VIP Club, who contributed £500, and the Friends of True’s Yard who provided £250.

“The sign required some very special carpentry work and repainting,” said Dr Richards. “We were delighted that Sir Jeremy Bagge, who has helped True’s Yard a great deal over the years, was able to come back after unveiling the first sign back in 2005.”

The green plaque on the former Tilden Smith pub, which became the Retreat in 1975, was paid for by Sam O’Callaghan from the Norfolk Building Company.

The put was where North End fisherfolk came to sing. In 1905, famous composer Ralph Vaughan Williams used some of the melodies to develop his work.

“The plaque disappeared when the building was converted into two houses, but contractor Sam O’Callaghan paid to have it replaced.”