King’s Lynn hospital research team celebrates 20 years

Research team at the QEH King's Lynn'left to right Kathryn Brown, Kayleigh Vine, Ieilani Cabreros, Parvez Moondi,Karen Lupton, Lynne Lingwood, Kate Wong and Tracy Fuller ANL-150520-175440009
Research team at the QEH King's Lynn'left to right Kathryn Brown, Kayleigh Vine, Ieilani Cabreros, Parvez Moondi,Karen Lupton, Lynne Lingwood, Kate Wong and Tracy Fuller ANL-150520-175440009
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The research team at Lynn’s Queen Elizabeth Hospital is looking for patients to take part in clinical studies to help save lives in the future.

Doctors, nurses and researchers have celebrated 20 years of helping to create cutting edge treatments and devices to help patients.

The team marked this milestone anniversary by taking part in International Research Day on Wednesday when staff promoted their work around the hospital.

The 14 strong team is also looking for patients willing to take part in safe clinical trials, which could include filling in a questionnaire or having a blood test.

Dr Parvez Moondi, the hospita’s research governance lead, said: “We try to encourage patients and relatives to ask doctors if there is any research they can take part in.

“Research is important as it furthers everyone’s treatment and we encourage people to be involved with it. It is all done safely.

“They could potentially help themselves and future patients.”

His colleague Kathryn Brown added: “It could potentially help the patient and decide their treatment and care pathway.

“It could also help their families and future generations that suffer from a particular condition or disease.”

The research team runs studies in all areas of the hospital including cancer care, surgery and critical care.

The government has increased the amount of funding ploughed into the team in recent years.

Dr Moondi said: “Within the cancer studies over the years, we have used treatments which have become standard care.”

The team has won a haul of awards for treatment in critical care.

It has also received awards for an alarm which lets nurses know if the drugs trolley has been left unattended.

The team have also created an arterial syringe which prevents drugs being injected into the wrong blood vessels.

Members of the team promoted their work with stands in the main reception and in the Resbite canteen on Wednesday afternoon.

The team’s work was also depicted in cake form thanks to a group of talented bakers.

Among the highlights on the cake table was a brain with a green interior.

This was judged to be the winning cake by hospital chief-executive Dorothy Hosein on the day.