King’s Lynn school to host technology conference

Christine Reilly from New South Wales Australia visiting Howard Junior School on technology fact-finding mission about how i pads can be used. With pupils from year 3.'left to right back Ellie-Mae Kirby, Hollie Castle, Alissa Howell and Gustus Gricius'left to right front Felix Edmore, Georgina Newell (YR 3 Teacher), Christine Reilly and Amber Bramham'' Contact 01553 774511 ANL-140906-155949009
Christine Reilly from New South Wales Australia visiting Howard Junior School on technology fact-finding mission about how i pads can be used. With pupils from year 3.'left to right back Ellie-Mae Kirby, Hollie Castle, Alissa Howell and Gustus Gricius'left to right front Felix Edmore, Georgina Newell (YR 3 Teacher), Christine Reilly and Amber Bramham'' Contact 01553 774511 ANL-140906-155949009
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A Lynn school is gearing up to host a major conference next week after securing a link-up with one of the world’s biggest technology companies.

Howard Junior School has become a regional training centre for Apple in Norfolk and will be offering a range of courses on the use of technology in education over the coming months.

Representatives from more than 40 schools are expected at the conference on Monday.

And headteacher Gregory Hill said he hopes the event will encourage other schools to embrace technology.

He said: “I’m looking beyond my school now. We’re at the cutting edge and we want that to spread. It’s transformational.”

The school has been leading the way in the use of technology since it began using iPads in lessons two years ago.

And Mr Hill believes the government’s drive for higher standards in next year’s SATS tests means other headteachers are more willing to follow Howard’s example.

Eighty-five per cent of primary school children will be required to achieve expected standards in the tests to prevent the school from being labelled as “coasting.”

The plan is aimed to raise achievement in schools with adequate results, but where officials believe even more could be achieved.

Mr Hill said: “There’s a real willingness in schools to embrace change positively.”