DCSIMG

Gaywood school ‘must improve’

The Lynn News Education Awards 2013 in Lynnsport's Sandringham Suite - runners-up in the Headteacher of the Year  were Gregory Hill (left) and Paul Shanks. ENGANL00120131121103122

The Lynn News Education Awards 2013 in Lynnsport's Sandringham Suite - runners-up in the Headteacher of the Year were Gregory Hill (left) and Paul Shanks. ENGANL00120131121103122

A headteacher has insisted his school is going in the right direction despite inspectors’ calls for further action to tackle weaknesses.

A new Ofsted report has concluded that the Gaywood Community Primary School “requires improvement” following an inspection visit made last month.

But headteacher Paul Shanks said the school had “come a long way” in recent times.

He said: “The changes we’ve made to date are having a positive impact on school and improving key areas.

“Our efforts are directed at continuing to make swift improvements so we can become an outstanding school, and we know we need to work hard to achieve our ambition.”

Mr Shanks pointed out that the proportion of Year Six children achieving the expected standards in reading, writing and maths had risen by 15 per cent this year, compared to the 2013 figure.

But lead inspector Teresa Kiely said last year’s results had been below average in writing and maths, and well below average in reading.

She added: “Not enough pupils have made more than expected progress.”

The school was rated as “good” at its last full inspection in 2009.

The current assessment was then delayed until this year as part of an initiative through which schools rated as good are inspected less often.

But the new report said teaching was not consistently good and too few pupils made good or better levels of progress.

It went on: “Work is often too easy and mundane to excite pupils’ interest and encourage them to learn.”

Activities provided by teaching assistants were said to often be “boring”

And the report also claimed that the school had been “over-optimistic in its view of teaching, achievement and leadership.”

It said: “Inconsistencies in pupils’ achievement show that teaching still requires improvement.”

However, there was praise for the quality of writing teaching and the progress made in writing and maths by infant children.

The report also noted that school leaders had worked hard to improve attendance levels, which are now just above average.

And Mr Shanks welcomed the inspectors’ praise of pupils’ behaviour and the quality of trips and activities, which the report said “enriched” youngsters’ learning.

He added; “Our work here continues in earnest and we are confident we can continue to improve.”

The head was also praised for implementing measures to improve the school, although other school leaders were “not sufficiently responsible for school improvement.”

The report called for an external review of the school’s governance to take place, in order to establish how governors can hold the school to account more effectively.

 
 
 

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