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King’s Lynn audience asks the questions of BBC panel

BBC's Question Time at Kings Lynn Corn Exchange
left to right Labours Shadow Welfare Reform Minister Chris Bryant MP, Liberal Democrat Tessa Munt MP; Editor of Private Eye Ian Hislop, David Dimbleby, Salma Yaqoob who leads the Hands Off Birmingham Schools and Conservative Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith MP ANL-140613-063922009

BBC's Question Time at Kings Lynn Corn Exchange left to right Labours Shadow Welfare Reform Minister Chris Bryant MP, Liberal Democrat Tessa Munt MP; Editor of Private Eye Ian Hislop, David Dimbleby, Salma Yaqoob who leads the Hands Off Birmingham Schools and Conservative Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith MP ANL-140613-063922009

Topics ranging from child obesity to the latest crisis in Iraq were on the agenda as the BBC’s Question Time programme returned to Lynn on Thursday night, June 12.

Around 150 people were chosen to be in the audience for the show, which was recorded at the town’s Corn Exchange, just over two years after its last visit to the venue.

They had the chance to grill a panel which included the work and pensions secretary, Iain Duncan Smith, who faced an uncomfortable reception both inside and outside the venue.

One audience member shouted: “Resign” as Mr Duncan Smith was criticised over expenses claims and his reforms of the welfare system.

And a small group of trade union activists, who oppose benefit changes, protested against the former Conservative leader’s policies both before and after the recording.

Prior to the show, members of the Fire Brigades Union had also handed out leaflets to audience members queuing to get into the Corn Exchange, explaining the arguments for their ongoing dispute with the Government, which saw them stage a 24-hour walkout on Thursday.

The other panellists appearing alongside veteran chairman David Dimbleby were Labour’s shadow welfare reform minister Chris Bryant, Liberal Democrat MP Tessa Munt, Private Eye editor Ian Hislop and Salma Yaqoob, head of the Hands Off Birmingham Schools campaign.

Her movement’s opposition to Ofsted’s decision to declare six of the city’s schools inadequate amid concerns over Muslim extremism, was debated in response to a question from West Norfolk councillor Avril Wright.

The warm-up question, posed by John Elworthy, asked whether Norfolk hoteliers should welcome the impact of the passport backlog affecting thousands of holidaymakers.

Questions during the programme covered the current crisis in Iraq, raised by Lynn News news editor Allister Webb, and the implications of the Newark by-election.

The concluding question concerned the case of the 11-year-old Lynn boy whose parents were arrested on suspicion of child neglect over his 15st weight.

 

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