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Narborough villagers tells drivers to slow down in new Speed Watch scheme

NARBOROUGH SPEED WATCH                               
 
Members of the Narborough Community Speed Watch team check traffic in Chalk lane.
From left  Victor Bucknell, Coralie Johnson (scheme co-ordinator), Maurice King, Carol Milne , Peter Wilkinson (Parish council chairman) and David Burchell (Clerk to the council).

NARBOROUGH SPEED WATCH Members of the Narborough Community Speed Watch team check traffic in Chalk lane. From left  Victor Bucknell, Coralie Johnson (scheme co-ordinator), Maurice King, Carol Milne , Peter Wilkinson (Parish council chairman) and David Burchell (Clerk to the council).

Residents and community leaders have joined forces to keep a closer eye on any drivers who may be tempted to flout the law in their area.

Villagers in Narborough have launched their own Speed Watch initiative in response to residents’ fears about motorists ignoring its 30 miles per hour speed limit.

So far, nine residents have been trained to use the surveillance equipment, while other volunteers are also welcome to join in.

And officials say that the programme made an immediate impact during its inaugural monitoring session last Friday.

Co-ordinator Maurice King, who is also a parish councillor, said: “They were dropping down to below 30 straight away as soon as they saw the signs and yellow jackets.”

Volunteers will patrol at five sites around the village, including Chalk Lane, where the initial monitoring session was held, Denny’s Walk, close to the village’s primary school, and the road which links the village with nearby RAF Marham.

Mr King said the worst of the speed problems the village faces are on the route to and from the base.

The Narborough scheme was set up after villagers approached the parish council with their concerns about both speeding and the alleged use of the village as a rat run by lorry drivers.

The initiative is fully supported by the authority, whose chairman, Peter Wilkinson, and clerk David Burchell are also volunteers.

Mr King said the team will monitor traffic in one location for up to an hour at a time before moving to another site.

Although he admitted the project is still in its early stages, and that speed issues re-emerge when the team are not on patrol, Mr King said the scheme had already been well received by local people, particularly those who had not previously known what they were doing.

“People think it’s a very good idea and they’re pleased to see us”, he said.

The programme is one of 10 new initiatives which are currently being set up in communities across Norfolk in conjunction with the police and Norfolk County Council.

There are now more than 50 such schemes across the county, which use speed guns provided by the county’s safety camera partnership to monitor motorists as they drive through the village.

The details of any vehicle breaking the speed limit are recorded and passed to the police, so that a warning letter can be sent out to the driver.

Ian Temperton, the council’s casualty reduction team manager, said: “While we all have personal responsibility to keep ourselves safe, the community speed watch teams take that to another level.

“They demonstrate that community responsibility is something we can all embrace.

“By working together we can ensure that the number of people who are killed and injured on the roads of Norfolk continues to reduce.”

Any other residents who are interested in volunteering for the Narborough Speed Watch should contact Mr King on 01760 337971 for more information.

 

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