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Nature fun for all the family at Sculthorpe Moor

Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve family fun day. Mum, Gemma Patrick, with Emilee and Madison Vladi on the wildlife quiz trail  

Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve family fun day. Something moved! 

Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve family fun day. Mother Jennifer Neville and son, Finn Miller-Neville  nature spotting  

Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve family fun day. Volunteers Jan Smith (left) and Vic Gerrard (right) watch a pair of marsh harriers with visitors Peter and Stephen Spurgeon   

Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve family fun day. Youngsters pond dipping at the reserve  

Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve family fun day. Mother Kaitlyn Appleby looks on as Emma and Cameron examine their pond-dipping catch

Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve family fun day. Mum, Gemma Patrick, with Emilee and Madison Vladi on the wildlife quiz trail Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve family fun day. Something moved! Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve family fun day. Mother Jennifer Neville and son, Finn Miller-Neville nature spotting Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve family fun day. Volunteers Jan Smith (left) and Vic Gerrard (right) watch a pair of marsh harriers with visitors Peter and Stephen Spurgeon Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve family fun day. Youngsters pond dipping at the reserve Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve family fun day. Mother Kaitlyn Appleby looks on as Emma and Cameron examine their pond-dipping catch

There was a lot to see and do when Sculthorpe Moor Nature Reserve held a Family Fun Day on Saturday.

“It was a day to encourage children to get involved with nature,” said education manager, Leanne Thomas.

“We want people to come and enjoy the reserve.”

Entry was free and it proved popular with a constant stream of visitors who could go on a wildlife nature quiz trail, pond-dip for water insects and fish or look for creepy crawlies on a mini-beasting tour that involved turning over the trunks and branches of fallen trees.

For some, pellet-dissecting was a way of discovering the feeding habits of owls.

If that didn’t excite visiting youngsters there was also the chance to build hidden shelters out of fallen branches and discarded greenery.

But adults were catered for, too. “There is a mile and a half of boarded walks and some people come just for a country walk whilst we also get a steady stream of photographers,” said Leanne.

Reed beds, an area of fen – a rare habitat nationally – and woodland has enabled a wide variety of animals to find a home on the reserve.

In season many different birds can be spotted, including water rails, bramblings, siskins, red polls, marsh harriers, bullfinches, kingfishers and barn owls.

Water voles enjoy the waterways and colourful butterflies and and dragonflies flit through the leaves.

Leanne said: “It’s not a place just for expert naturalists.

“Everybody can enjoy the environment.”

 

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