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Staff at King’s Lynn QEH would not recommend the hospital, survey says

King's Lynn Queen Elizabeth Hospital, half of its staff would not recommend it

King's Lynn Queen Elizabeth Hospital, half of its staff would not recommend it

Half of Lynn’s Queen Elizabeth Hospital (QEH) staff do not believe they would be happy with the standard of service it provides for their own friend or relative.

That is according to responses given to the latest NHS staff survey, which saw QEH’s employees rank it as below average – little change from the previous year.

The survey also revealed that almost one in five QEH staff, 19 per cent, had experienced physical violence from patients, relatives or the public in last 12 months.

The hospital was placed in special measures last year.

Dr Manjit Obhrai, new QEH chief executive, said: “This has been a challenging time for the trust and the findings are similar to those in the 2012 survey.

“I am particularly pleased that staff motivation remains amongst the best 20 per cent of acute trusts in the country and that ‘effective team working’ appears amongst our five top-ranking scores.

“Those areas requiring improvement are already high on our agenda, with many initiatives already underway to improve our scores for next year. These areas include improving communication between senior management and staff, and staff recommending the trust as a place to work or receive treatment.

“We know good communication is the key to having engaged staff and one thing I have begun is a weekly blog, via the Trust intranet, to keep staff informed on current events and progress.

“I wish to thank our staff for their continuing commitment to providing high quality and accessible services to our patients and their relatives. We look forward to seeing a progressive set of results from the 2014 survey.”

The survey responses put the QEH amongst the top NHS Trusts for working effectively as a team and experiencing lower than average rates of harassment, bullying and abuse from colleagues.

QEH staff also put the trust at better-than-average for not putting pressure on workers to turn up for their shift when they are unwell and for having plenty of hand-washing materials available.

The East of England Ambulance Service, which serves West Norfolk and has undergone criticism for failing to meet response targets, was also ranked as below average by its staff.

Only 40 per cent of staff said if a friend or relative needed treatment, they would be happy with the standard of care provided by this organisation. That was an improvement from the previous year, when the figure was 36 per cent. Nationally, only 53 per cent of ambulance service staff could agree that they would be happy with the service for a relative or friend.

A total of 31 per cent of staff said they had experienced physical violence from patients, relatives or the public in last 12 months.

Only 35 per cent of ambulance staff believed patients were organisation’s top priority, compared to 39 per cent nationally.

Areas where the service compared most favourably included team working and the frequency of harmful errors witnessed by staff.

Click here for the full survey results: NHS staff surveys

 

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