DCSIMG

The Word on the Street: Your fears over King’s Lynn incinerator bill

Willows Business Park Saddlebow, King's Lynn

Land in the foreground is the proposed site for the incinerator ENGANL00120131018142016

Willows Business Park Saddlebow, King's Lynn Land in the foreground is the proposed site for the incinerator ENGANL00120131018142016

As members of Norfolk County Council prepare to decide the fate of the Lynn incinerator project, we asked West Norfolk residents how they wanted their representatives to vote at Monday’s crucial meeting.

But, while some of the people we spoke to in the centre of Lynn were adamant that the scheme should be scrapped, many admitted to concerns about the bill, estimated at around £30 million, that the taxpayer is set to be left with.

Lynn resident David Scase said: “I am keeping an open mind on it because of the money involved.” He suggested that if the incinerator was to go ahead we should be worried about the pollutants in the air that we wouldn’t necessarily see.

Questions about money were also raised by Moya Luckett from Lynn who said: “To be perfectly honest how much is this costing?” She continued by suggesting that the penalties for not complying with the incinerator plans as they stand “are horrendous and it’s us paying it.”

She asked where the waste would go if the incinerator wasn’t built and said: “People’s thoughts of pollution are probably exaggerated.”

Manda King who works in Lynn said: “I would like to know what is the other option? What are they doing with the rubbish?”

She felt that cost should be a factor in any decision made: “If it is spiralling out of control than we need to think of cheaper options.”

A similar viewpoint was held by Sophia Rostron who suggested alternative ways that taxpayers’ money could be spent: “I think there is a lot to spend money on rather than the incinerator like training for young people or encouraging young people to see the goodness that can come out of education.”

Seonaid Collins from Walpole Cross Keys suggested that councillors should vote to “scrap it”.

She suggested alternative ways of disposing of rubbish: “During the war everything was collected, sorted and utilised. Rather than people working in the incinerator that would also create jobs locally.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page