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Market Plates - The very pick of Piccalilli to make the best of British

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One of our favourite condiments here at the Market Bistro that we like to serve with our homemade terrines, local cheese or cold meats is British Piccalilli.

We are always getting asked how we make ours and although we have done this recipe before we thought we would revisit it.

If you make this now it will keep really well and will be great to use at Christmas time to eat with your leftover turkey and cold meats on Boxing Day.

Piccalilli has been around for years, first recipes date back to the middle of the 18th Century but no one is really sure where it came from.

The vegetables and mustard are English but the turmeric is not and there is a similar Indian Pickle called Achar. Whatever its’ origins Piccalilli is a British food favourite and with cauliflowers being a local inexpensive sustainable food source is the perfect choice for us.

Here we would like to give you our simple recipe, why not invest in some nice kilnar jars and give some to family and friends as a Christmas gift made with love.

Recipe

25 grams of salt

1 cauliflower - chopped

3 large onions – chopped

8 shallots – chopped

600 ml white wine vinegar

300 ml malt vinegar

¼ tablespoon dried chilli

350 grams caster sugar

50 grams mustard powder

25 grams turmeric

3 tablespoons corn flour

Seasoning

One of our favourite condiments here at the Market Bistro that we like to serve with our homemade terrines, local cheese or cold meats is British Piccalilli.

We are always getting asked how we make ours and although we have done this recipe before we thought we would revisit it.

If you make this now it will keep really well and will be great to use at Christmas time to eat with your leftover turkey and cold meats on Boxing Day.

Piccalilli has been around for years, first recipes date back to the middle of the 18th Century but no one is really sure where it came from.

The vegetables and mustard are English but the turmeric is not and there is a similar Indian Pickle called Achar. Whatever its’ origins Piccalilli is a British food favourite and with cauliflowers being a local inexpensive sustainable food source is the perfect choice for us.

Here we would like to give you our simple recipe, why not invest in some nice kilnar jars and give some to family and friends as a Christmas gift made with love.

Method

Soak the cauliflower, onions and shallots in salt and water for 24 hours, rinse and dry.

Bring vinegars and chilli up to the boil in a saucepan and then strain.

Mix the dry ingredients together and add a little of the boiled vinegar at a time whisking until combined.

Add Cauliflower, onions and shallots and stir until thickened.

The mixture should then be left to cool and then poured into sterilised jars.

recipe

25 grams of salt

1 cauliflower - chopped

3 large onions – chopped

8 shallots – chopped

600 ml white wine vinegar

300 ml malt vinegar

¼ tablespoon dried chilli

350 grams caster sugar

50 grams mustard powder

25 grams turmeric

3 tablespoons corn flour

Seasoning

 

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