Restorative justice for Cambrigdeshire

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Victims of crime can now request to meet their offender in a restorative justice conference organised byh Cambridgeshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner.

Sir Graham Bright and Cambridgeshire Constabulary have pledged to work in partnership with other agencies to develop restorative justice in the county.

These initiatives allowing the victim to explain to the offender the impact of their actions. It also enables the victim to understand why the offender behaved the way they did.

The Ministry of Justice has provided all PCCs with an initial two years’ funding, as part of the Victims’ Services Grant, to facilitate victim-initiated restorative justice.

Sir Graham said: “It is great to be able to yet again improve the experience for victims of crime in Cambridgeshire. This work follows hot on the heels of the launch of our police-led Victims’ Hub and we expect the Victim Care Co-ordinators will be instrumental in explaining to victims what is now available.

“While I have asked the Constabulary to lead this work for me, they can’t do this alone and we have already been having conversations with existing restorative justice providers in the county about how we can work together. I was also keen to ensure we had access to real experts in this area which is why I appointed Restorative Solutions to support the Cambridgeshire approach.”

Deputy Chief Constable Alec Wood has championed the use of restorative justice in the Constabulary and says it could make a “real difference” to the lives of those who choose to get involved.

He said: ““The evidence is clear that victims of crime who take part in restorative conferences are more likely to be able to move on from the crime committed against them. Offenders are less likely to offend again – so it’s a win-win situation.”