Road safety warning over King’s Lynn homes bid

The 'horrible noise' is due to the demolition of a former sewage works in Fairplace Hill, which will eventually see 325 new homes built on the site
The 'horrible noise' is due to the demolition of a former sewage works in Fairplace Hill, which will eventually see 325 new homes built on the site

Plans to build new homes on the former site of a Lynn funeral director could jeopardise road safety because of a lack of parking, roads officials have warned.

Eleven homes are proposed for the old A J Coggles premises on London Road, with one parking space for each property.

But, although planners have backed the scheme ahead of a meeting next week, county roads officers are opposed to the scheme.

They said: “The proposal does not incorporate adequate on-site vehicular parking facilities to the standard required by the local planning authority.

“The proposal, if permitted, would therefore be likely to lead to an undesirable increase in on-street parking to the detriment to highway safety.”

However, members of the West Norfolk Council planning committee have been urged to approve the scheme when they meet in Lynn on Monday.

Planning officer David Parkin reported: “The proposal is in a central location well served by local shops and public transport.

“The relatively small short-fall in on-site parking provision is considered acceptable in this instance.”

The application has been submitted by A J Coggles itself, who moved away from the site to its current premises in Blackfriars Street three years ago.

The scheme proposes the conversion of the existing buildings into three homes, with eight more being built in the car park area. Vehicle access to the site is proposed from Guanock Terrace.

An initial plan for 25 homes on the site, and the demolition of the funeral parlour buildings, was first lodged with the council five years ago.

The report said the new application had been drawn up by new planning agents which were hired by the firm earlier this year.

Mr Parkin added: “The revised scale in terms of the physical number of units and the scale of the building are considered to preserve the character of the conservation area and the impact upon residential amenity is considered acceptable given the relationships between dwellings that already exist in this densely developed part of King’s Lynn.”