ROYAL NORFOLK SHOW 2015 - Lots to celebrate for West Norfolk on day two

Royal Norfolk Show 2015'Crowds flock to watch piglets from Church Farm, Stow Bardolph, racing each other
Royal Norfolk Show 2015'Crowds flock to watch piglets from Church Farm, Stow Bardolph, racing each other
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Champions galore in the livestock classes and the launch of a home-grown ‘taste from waste’ food brand gave West Norfolk plenty to celebrate on the second day of the county show.

Tomatoes grown at British Sugar’s Cornerways Nursery, at Wissington, were the main ingredient in a new chutney which was flying off the counter in the food hall.

Royal Norfolk Show 2015'Grimston brothers and prize-winning cattle handlers Robbie Moore (14) and Ryan Moore (16)

Royal Norfolk Show 2015'Grimston brothers and prize-winning cattle handlers Robbie Moore (14) and Ryan Moore (16)

Cornerways, which is the largest British tomato nursery, producing more than 140 million tomatoes each year, has teamed up with Candi’s Chutney, a small family firm based near Fakenham, to find a use for fruit not suitable for the main retail markets but too good to throw away.

“It is one way of reducing waste,” said Helen Kitchen, who was one of the team on the Cornerways stand. “It goes to Candi who makes the chutney for us and we are now hoping to roll it out into local farm shops. At the moment we have paprika, green tomato and chilli flavours on the menu.”

Candi Robertson said that the deal means she will be able to move her business from her home at Foulsham into a unit at Holt. “But we will still be producing our chutney in the old-fashioned way and hand stirring it in giant pans,” she said.

In the cattle rings more trophies and rosettes were heading in the direction of West Norfolk.

Teenage brothers Ryan (16) and Robbie Moore (14) successfully exhibited Aberdeen Angus from the family’s Fenland Herd, from Oak Farm, Fen Lane, Grimston.

Their awards included the male and junior championships for their 16-month old bull Fenland My Prize, the award for the best Norfolk bred bull and also the reserve breed championship for a nine-month-old British Blonde.

Both Ryan, who will shortly be starting a course at Easton College to follow in the family farming tradition, and Robbie also won their young handler’s classes – and their eight-year-old brother Mason was sixth in his category.

Another championship went to Delamore Farms, of Terrington St Clement, in the British White classes. Their heifer Bulby Lupin won her class and then went on to take the female title and was reserve best in breed while the bull Cadam Dump Truck was class winner and reserve male champion.

In the sheep rings, Collison and Associates‘ 14-month-old shearling Shetland ram was male champion, Norfolk champion and then went on to take the best in breed title. The Collison family, from Tilney All Saints, also celebrated son George’s success with his own shearling ewe which won the reserve female championship.

Away from the livestock there was another full programme of entertainment on the showground for the second day, including the Falcons parachute team landing on target in the main ring and also the Household Cavalry’s colourful musical ride.

Thursday also saw the final rounds of the two-day farriery competition which was staged on the showground for the first time. Contestants took part in the searing heat being given a hour to make two shoes, including one which had to be nailed to a horse’s hoof.

Rob Reeve, from Saddlebow, who co-ordinated the event, said that he was delighted with the event which had attracted farriers from all over the country and was a big attraction for the crowds.