Snettisham school pupils have the bottle to be healthy

Snettisham Primary School pupils with the new water bottles.'Back LtoR, Cerys Davies, Megan Drury, Mithu Balamurugah, Archie Frost.'Front LtoR, Matthew Crossman, Isla Whyman, Corey King, Mia Rodrigues ANL-161201-140713009
Snettisham Primary School pupils with the new water bottles.'Back LtoR, Cerys Davies, Megan Drury, Mithu Balamurugah, Archie Frost.'Front LtoR, Matthew Crossman, Isla Whyman, Corey King, Mia Rodrigues ANL-161201-140713009
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Pupils at a West Norfolk village school have shown they have the bottle to live a healthy lifestyle.

That’s because youngsters at the Snettisham Primary have each been given their own water bottles, which bosses hope will encourage them to choose water rather than other, perhaps less healthy, options.

Headteacher Lee Stevens said the move was part of a wider drive to promote healthy living both within the school and the wider community.

He said: “There were a number of children who were drinking fruit juices during the day and we were concerned about the sugar content.”

The bottles were purchased as a condition within the school’s wider healthy eating policy, which has been developed over several months.

Mr Stevens said he hoped they would serve as a “reminder” to pupils both of the best things for them to have when they need a drink during lessons and the need to keep water levels up.

Parents have been involved in the development of the framework, which extends previous policies against the consumption of fizzy drinks in children’s lunches.

Mr Stevens said the idea was for the policy to be a “community statement”, rather than one which just represented the views of the school.

And he admitted there had been “fairly robust” discussions with some parents about the new ideas.

But, although he said they were still working with parents who had voiced concerns, the message is clear that fruit juices should soon be a thing of the past in the classroom.

He said: “We’re asking them if they can dilute it so they’re weaned off it over time.”