Students tell tales of their home’s history on stage in King’s Lynn

Children from schools in the Downham Market area who took part in the Noted Liars performance at King's Lynn's Alive Corn Exchange. Photo: SUBMITTED.
Children from schools in the Downham Market area who took part in the Noted Liars performance at King's Lynn's Alive Corn Exchange. Photo: SUBMITTED.

Youngsters from primary schools in the Downham cluster have taken to the stage at Lynn’s Alive Corn Exchange to tell tales about the past.

The children, from seven schools in the area, were at the venue to perform the culmination of the first year of the Heritage Lottery-funded Noted Liars project.

Students from St Germans, Magdalen, Wimbotsham and Stow, Nelson Academy, Runcton Holme and Wormegay got creative for the activity.

Noted Liars is a two-year project of activities which aims to revive interest in rural Fenland customs from a century ago, from the perspective of to men who were encouraged to write about local heritage by Enid Porter of the Cambridge Folk Museum.

The first year concentrated on the writings of Arthur Randell from Magdalen, who was born in 1901 and spent most of his life working on the railways in the Fens.

His great love, however, was observing the flora and fauna of the Fenland.

He followed the family tradition of mole catching – his father had been responsible for controlling moles along the banks of the Ouse all the way from Saddlebow to Denver Sluice.

Pupils have, throughout the year, looked at life through his stories and recollections and learnt songs collected in the area alongside molly dancing, a traditional dance from the Fens.

Using Arthur’s stories as a stimulus, they worked with professional writer Holly Phillips and director Jenny Groom to write and produce plays based on the stories.