Talk about a crash pad! Birds make helmet a home in Wereham

Baby Robins Nest inside of a Motorcross Helmet in the garage of High House, Lynn Rd, Wereham, King's Lynn
Bobby Zalums (6) (left) and Charlie Webb (6) (right) with the Helmet and nest
Baby Robins Nest inside of a Motorcross Helmet in the garage of High House, Lynn Rd, Wereham, King's Lynn Bobby Zalums (6) (left) and Charlie Webb (6) (right) with the Helmet and nest

It is widely accepted that creepy crawlies will make themselves at home in garages, but one West Norfolk woman found a nest of slightly larger creatures in hers.

Lisa Webb discovered a bird’s nest inside her partner’s motorcross helmet while sorting out their belongings at their home in Wereham a month ago.

A robins nest inside a motorbike helmet in Wereham.

A robins nest inside a motorbike helmet in Wereham.

She said: “I had been watching a robin fly in and out of the garage but I didn’t think to look in the helmet until I saw the bird fly out of it. I looked and saw there was a nest.

“I had just been sorting out things out, and was up on a ladder when I saw it. The nest has been there for quite a while now.”

Four baby robins hatched out of their egg shells in the nest on Wednesday last week, she said, and have since started chirping.

Despite having lived with the knowledge that she had some unexpected visitors in her garage for at least a month, it still catches her off-guard, she said.

A robins nest inside a motorbike helmet in Wereham.

A robins nest inside a motorbike helmet in Wereham.

“Everytime I walk in the shed, I’m conscious that a robin could fly at me. It still makes me jump every time,” she added.

The discovery has caused quite a stir with her family, who have paid visits to the newborns.

“My two girls used to call my nan ‘Nanny Birdy’ as she would point out all the different types of birds in the garden.

“My nan and grandad have always loved birds, and my nephews Charlie and Bobby both love them too.

Baby Robins Nest inside of a Motorcross Helmet in the garage of High House, Lynn Rd, Wereham, King's Lynn
Babies in the nest

Baby Robins Nest inside of a Motorcross Helmet in the garage of High House, Lynn Rd, Wereham, King's Lynn Babies in the nest

“They have their own canaries so they were really excited to come and see the robins.”

The family has since put out bird feeders with food including seeds, nuts, raisins and suet to ensure the flock of birds eat well.

“I don’t really know what to do with it but I’m going to leave them – we don’t want to disturb them – and hopefully they will eventually leave the nest.”

Asked about the condition of the helmet belonging to her partner, Julian McGuirk, she said: “It’s ruined, they’ve pecked it all up. But he will have to get over it!”

Baby Robins Nest inside of a Motorcross Helmet in the garage of High House, Lynn Rd, Wereham, King's Lynn
The Mother Robin, waiting to enter the nest

Baby Robins Nest inside of a Motorcross Helmet in the garage of High House, Lynn Rd, Wereham, King's Lynn The Mother Robin, waiting to enter the nest

She said the situation has not caused too many issues for her partner, though, as the helmet had not seen much use in a while, and it certainly does not look like it will be any time soon either.

It is expected that the robins will remain in the helmet until they can fledge the nest.

Following the Wereham family’s unusual discovery, bird conservation charity RSPB has offered its advice should others find themselves in a similar situation.

An RSPB spokeswoman said: “Legally speaking you cannot intentionally destroy, damage or move an active nest.

“Therefore Miss Webb did the right thing by leaving the nest inside of the helmet.”

She said that nests should be left alone during the time when the eggs are being incubated.

Baby Robins Nest inside of a Motorcross Helmet in the garage of High House, Lynn Rd, Wereham, King's Lynn

Baby Robins Nest inside of a Motorcross Helmet in the garage of High House, Lynn Rd, Wereham, King's Lynn

It is also important to let the birds fledge – which refers to the stage between hatching and flight – naturally.

She said: “When they get to the age when they can fly and leave the nest, and once they have fledged and the nest has definitely become inactive, you can then dispose of the nesting materials.”

For anyone who may have concerns for their biking equipment, the charity said the probability of this happening is quite small.

“For people routinely using helmets, you are not likely to come and find something like this overnight. It’s not something people should be worried about.

“It takes the birds quite a bit of time to build a nest.”

For more information, you can visit: www.rspb.org.uk.