Titchwell plays host to cop turned crime author

Clare Mackintosh, centre, meets of a few of her fans.  From left - Val Johnstone (Briarfields co-owner), Caroline Richardson, Dot Lloyd co-owner), Morag Kitchener and Jac (Jac) Sandy (organiser) MLNF16PB04075 ANL-160418-113238001
Clare Mackintosh, centre, meets of a few of her fans. From left - Val Johnstone (Briarfields co-owner), Caroline Richardson, Dot Lloyd co-owner), Morag Kitchener and Jac (Jac) Sandy (organiser) MLNF16PB04075 ANL-160418-113238001

She is an object lesson for all those who suspect that you shouldn’t listen to what your teacher tells you and on Sunday she came to meet fans.

As a student, Clare Mackintosh was keen to write but was told by her career’s teacher that writing was not a proper job.

On Sunday, the now-successful author was in Titchwell to meet many of her fans following the success of her first book, I Let You Go, which was in the Sunday Times Best Seller list for 12 weeks and became the fastest selling book by a new crime writer in 2015.

Miss Mackintosh appeared at a Bookfest, a meet-the-author event organised by the Briarfields Hotel.

The occasion was a sell-out with the author, a former police woman, regaling her audience with her journey from crime fighter to crime writer.

Her debut novel has now been translated into 30 foreign languages and has sold over half a million copies in less than a year.

But although writing for her own pleasure early in life her success as an author had to wait.

By accident she attended a university lecture on a career in the police force and was smitten.

After 12 years with the Thames Valley Police she had risen to the rank of Public Order Commander and on the way had seen just about every walk of life.

“From the aristocracy down,” she said.

She admitted as a white, middle-class woman, that it had been an eye-opener.

It also enhanced her understanding of the human condition with other ‘powerful ingredients’ being added when she gave birth to twins 12 weeks early and one, Alex, died of meningitis when he was only five weeks old.

After the birth of a second set of twins within 15 months she was diagnosed with postnatal depression.

It added yet another dimension to her understanding of life.

The wide range of her experience of ‘real life’ and the tumbled emotions of her private life have produced a major writer whose second book, I See You, appears later this year. In addition she is already under contract with her publisher, Little Brown, for two more.