VIDEO: King’s Lynn water bailiff honoured in boat ceremony

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A former Lynn water bailiff who drowned more than a century ago was honoured in the town yesterday.

A new fishery patrol vessel (FPV) has been named after Sebastian Terelinck, who drowned in December 1913.

The new boat, FPV Sebastian Terelinck, was formally named in a ceremony on Lynn’s waterfront on Sunday afternoon, which was attended by many of Mr Terelinck’s relatives.

Several of them flew in from Sydney, Australia for the ceremony, including his great grand-daughter Chorel, who unveiled the tribute alongside North West Norfolk MP Henry Bellingham.

She said: “We are one very, very proud Terelinck family.”

Mr Terelinck, who worked in fisheries management for nearly 40 years, died on December 29, 1913, aged 75, alongside his 23-year-old assistant, John Allen, who had a boat named after him two years ago.

Re-Laying Gravestone of Sebastian Terelinck at Hardwick Cemetery, by Eastern Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority, LtoR, Front, Julian Gregory (Chief Executive Officer EIFCA) and Jason Byrne (Local Area Officer EIFCA), also in pic (centre) are Stone Mason's from H. Brett & Son, Keith Blake (left) and Leon May (right)  who undertook the restoration of the grave. ANL-151109-173239009

Re-Laying Gravestone of Sebastian Terelinck at Hardwick Cemetery, by Eastern Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority, LtoR, Front, Julian Gregory (Chief Executive Officer EIFCA) and Jason Byrne (Local Area Officer EIFCA), also in pic (centre) are Stone Mason's from H. Brett & Son, Keith Blake (left) and Leon May (right) who undertook the restoration of the grave. ANL-151109-173239009

At the time of their deaths, the men were working for the Eastern Sea Fisheries joint committee, now the Eastern Inshore Fishery and Conservation Authority (IFCA).

And the authority’s vice-chairman, Norfolk county councillor Hilary Cox, said of the new vessel: “It will reunite a powerful enforcement team that ensured our valuable regional fisheries commodities were managed to benefit all.

“She will help that same duty to be delivered today. Sebastian’s legacy will live with her.”

Mr Bellingham said it was a “huge honour” to take part in the ceremony

“Anyone who lives in West Norfolk will know that the history of the Wash and shellfishing is woven into our local culture, almost into our DNA.

“For a man who served this community over so many years, I think it’s highly appropriate that we’re actually naming this vessel after him and I’m delighted that the family and their representatives are with us today.”

The new vessel, a 12 metre rigid hulled inflatable boat, will primarily be used to patrol the Suffolk, Norfolk and Lincolnshire coastlines up to six miles off shore to ensure that environment and fishing regulations are followed.

The boat, which was largely designed by IFCA officials themselves, has also been equipped to support marine research projects and the work of other government agencies.

And Mr Bellingham said: “It’s going to do a superb job of making sure this world-class inshore fishery is properly controlled and overseen for the benefit of all those who fish in the Wash and the local economy.”

The ceremony was held alongside the town’s programme of Heritage Open Day events, which attracted thousands of people to many historic sites and buildings.

It also followed the unveiling of a newly-restored headstone for Mr Terelinck’s grave in the Hardwick Road cemetery on Friday.