West Norfolk mental health organisation receives £375k lottery fund

One to One Project awarded lottery grant. Pictured at Nelson House Bergen Way King's Lynn. FLtoR Christopher Macloud.Hannah Cooper.Jackie Wrout. Nell Steele. Simon Clarke.
One to One Project awarded lottery grant. Pictured at Nelson House Bergen Way King's Lynn. FLtoR Christopher Macloud.Hannah Cooper.Jackie Wrout. Nell Steele. Simon Clarke.

A charity that provides long-term support to adults in West Norfolk who experience emotional or physical distress has been awarded a lottery grant.

One to One Project, which was established as a charity in 1984, has been awarded £375,000 in a five-year grant from the Big Lottery’s Reaching Communities Programme.

The charity relies on grant funding to provide long-term support to adults with mental health difficulties or who experience emotional or physical distress, and offers a non-judgmental space for them to talk in confidence about their needs, worries or issues.

Project manager, Hannah Cooper said: “This is great news for us as we rely on grant funds to provide vital long-term mental health services, a provision which is not available elsewhere in King’s Lynn and West Norfolk.

“We were delighted on hearing the news that we had been awarded the lottery grant funding.

“It means we can carry on delivering our services for another five years. It will also allow us to provide care to more people across West Norfolk who have mental health difficulties.”

The project aims to embed support within an individual’s day to day life, and ensure that their unique experience of mental health difficulties does not become a barrier to everyday opportunities, employment and relationships.

The service provides counselling, mentoring, peer support groups and group work in a confidential environment near Lynn’s towns centre or in one of their outreach venues across the county.

They offer a range of approaches, including, cognitive behavioural therapy, transactional analysis, person centred, gestalt and psychodynamic.

The project team are supervised regularly by independent practitioners to ensure they are working ethically.

Hannah Cooper added: “In a country where it is difficult to freely access mental health services, we take pride in the work we do and we hope it makes a difference to those who use our services. We are delighted that we will now be able to help more people and continue supporting those who need us for another five years.”

The project regularly recruits new volunteers to join their team of counsellors, mentors and trustees. For more information visit, www.onetooneproject.com.