Work begins to transform King’s Lynn troublespot

Kettlewell Lane area residents along with the Borough Council and West Norfolk with Norfolk Wildlife Trust join forces  on conservation project. ANL-141013-132701009
Kettlewell Lane area residents along with the Borough Council and West Norfolk with Norfolk Wildlife Trust join forces on conservation project. ANL-141013-132701009
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Residents, nature charity workers and community representatives have joined forces to help clean up a Lynn trouble spot.

West Norfolk Council and Norfolk Wildlife Trust officials have drawn up plans to transform the Kettlewell Lane Park into a haven for nature.

Kettlewell Lane area residents along with the Borough Council and West Norfolk with Norfolk Wildlife Trust join forces  on conservation project. Archdale Street resident John Filowiat. ANL-141013-132646009

Kettlewell Lane area residents along with the Borough Council and West Norfolk with Norfolk Wildlife Trust join forces on conservation project. Archdale Street resident John Filowiat. ANL-141013-132646009

Supporters braved driving rain to begin clearing brambles and rubbish from the site this week, while more local people are being encouraged to take part in the programme.

In recent years, the area has become overgrown and been blighted by anti-social behaviour.

Ward councillor Lesley Bambridge, who has been heavily involved in the campaign to clean up the area, said she had seen needles and bottles left there, as well as evidence suggesting people were sleeping rough.

Wood had also been set alight, though it is believed that may have been caused by vandalism as well as any rough sleepers.

Miss Bambridge said she had taken up the issue after seeing the area for herself and following meetings with residents.

She said: “The local community use the area as a cut through to get to school, work and the shops and it has become an eyesore.”

The council used its compulsory purchase powers to buy the site in December 2012 and have worked with the Norfolk Wildlife Trust to develop a conservation plan.

Wildflowers, nut and fruit trees will be planted in a bid to encourage more butterflies and bees to the site. Hedges will be managed while bird and bat boxes will also be installed.

And officials plan to cut new paths in order to improve pedestrian access to the area.

Sixteen people took part in the initial clean-up event at the site on Monday.

Miss Bambridge said: “It was fantastic. We got on so well considering it was such a bad day.”

She added: “I am so pleased that the borough council has taken action and that, with the help of residents and Norfolk Wildlife Trust, we can make this a better place for the community.”

A further community event is also set to take place at the site next month.

Anyone interested in getting involved with the project should contact Miss Bambridge on 01553 765154.