Letters: Anna Reeves, March 8, 2016

Greg Plummer trying Double Donut Burger that has been called "a heart attack on a plate" because it contains 1,996 calories and 53 grams of saturated fat ANL-141113-081829009
Greg Plummer trying Double Donut Burger that has been called "a heart attack on a plate" because it contains 1,996 calories and 53 grams of saturated fat ANL-141113-081829009
0
Have your say

I was astounded to read in the Health Section of the Lynn News (February 23) that the body coach Joe Wicks recommends that people should eat saturated fat because ‘it’s actually really, really good for you’.

I cannot imagine how he reaches this disturbing conclusion but would disagree most strongly. Whilst it is true that we need a little essential fat in our diet to repair tissue, manufacture hormones, carry some vitamins and lubricate joints, it is imperative we avoid the saturated variety which is predominantly of animal derivation and normally solid at room temperature. This includes butter and lard and can be found in all animal foodstuffs such as milk, meat, fish, eggs and cheese. There are very few saturated vegetable fats, coconut and palm oil being the most common. Unsaturated fats are normally liquid at room temperature and include olive and sunflower oil.

Too much of the wrong kind of fat in our diet is firmly linked to some cancers, high blood pressure, clogged arteries, heart attacks and strokes. Diseases of this sort are exacerbated by an excess intake of cholesterol which is a fat-like substance found in animal foods but completely absent from those which are plant-based. A diet rich in animal free foods and containing unsaturated fat from nuts and seeds, such as walnuts, almonds, brazil nuts and sunflower seeds can significantly lower the risk of heart disease and keep the body in a good state of repair. More information about a plant-based diet can be obtained by emailing info@viva-org.uk or by calling 0117 944 1000.

Anna Reeves, Saddlebow Village