Letters: Bryan Howling, May 5, 2017

Northamptonshire County Council says 82 per cent of pupils received their first-choice secondary school place.
Northamptonshire County Council says 82 per cent of pupils received their first-choice secondary school place.

Recently school spending has been in the news with much ado about prospective funding and the fear of cuts in budgets with the usual speculation that this will bring about cutting of teaching posts.

That kind of suggestion is good publicity to instil fear and trepidation into the teaching profession and parents in particular. But also intended to provoke central government with fear of doom and gloom hoping to get funding increased and is a little misleading. Looking at the suggestions of under funding for schools needs to look a bit more into how schools are spending their money. As I see it there seems to be something of an empire building intent going on at present. The great majority of a schools property tends to have become car parks and one wonders who all these cars belong to, and why they are there. A great proportion, I gather, are ancillary staff, yet at the first hint of staff cuts will mean the loss of a teacher. I feel that there is an urgent need to look at the proliferation of school staffing and particular at the non- teaching element. Take a look at school playgrounds and the number of cars parked in what were formerly play areas for the pupils. Visit schools’ websites and check on the staffing levels. You may be surprised by the numbers you will find in quite small schools. If there are savings to be made, then perhaps it is not to take the route of cutting teaching staff but to look carefully at those who are not teachers but are on the pay roll. The impression from the general public’s point of view from these overburdened car parks is that there seems, in this case, to be too many Indians in relation to chiefs.

Bryan Howling

Terrington St Clement