Letters: Edward Wheatley, November 27, 2015

Queen Elizabeth II, the Duke of Edinburgh and the Prince of Wales (left) await the arrival of the Commons MPs during the State Opening of Parliament, in the House of Lords at the Palace of Westminster in London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday May 27, 2015. See PA story POLITICS Speech. Photo credit should read: John Stillwell/PA Wire PPP-150527-125356001
Queen Elizabeth II, the Duke of Edinburgh and the Prince of Wales (left) await the arrival of the Commons MPs during the State Opening of Parliament, in the House of Lords at the Palace of Westminster in London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday May 27, 2015. See PA story POLITICS Speech. Photo credit should read: John Stillwell/PA Wire PPP-150527-125356001
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Not often I agree with Mr Vinehill, but I do agree we should do away with the House of Lords.

However, I believe it is the composition not the concept that needs alteration. We do need a second revising chamber if for no better reason than MPs don’t read bills thoroughly, or lack the courage to go against the party whip.

And it may seem antidemocratic, but I also think its members should be appointed, not elected. Only then will we be free of the party system. These new members might be called Senators or Representatives.

In the revised composition obviously all hereditary peers and the bishops would be excluded.

Then I would suggest that nobody who had held public office above the rank of local councillor should be eligible. This would stop the place being used to pay back favours and for dumping old MPs. Nobody who had not held a proper job for less than 10 years should be appointed. All appointees should be respected specialists in their field so that they could bring along unique knowledge and experience. Finally, a minimum number of days of attendance would be required.The old honours system could be maintained to reward party donors, long serving nonentities and the like, but these peers would have no power.

Of course, it may be Christmas but I don’t think the turkeys in Parliament will be voting for it.

Edward Wheatley

Bernard Crescent

Hunstanton