Letters: Ian Borrmann, October 13, 2015

Syrian refugees who have arrived with this recent wave of refugees over the last five days fight for clothes and other items being distributed by Kurdish people at the Kawergost camp outside of Erbil, in Northern Iraq, August 20, 2013. Over 30,000 new Syrian refugees have crossed into Northern Iraq in the past five days, as Iraq opened its border to Kurdish civilians fleeing Syrias civil war. Credit Lynsey Addario for The New York Times                               NYTCREDIT: Lynsey Addario for The New York Times                              NYTCREDIT: Lynsey Addario for The New York Times PPP-150930-114726001
Syrian refugees who have arrived with this recent wave of refugees over the last five days fight for clothes and other items being distributed by Kurdish people at the Kawergost camp outside of Erbil, in Northern Iraq, August 20, 2013. Over 30,000 new Syrian refugees have crossed into Northern Iraq in the past five days, as Iraq opened its border to Kurdish civilians fleeing Syrias civil war. Credit Lynsey Addario for The New York Times NYTCREDIT: Lynsey Addario for The New York Times NYTCREDIT: Lynsey Addario for The New York Times PPP-150930-114726001
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Have your say

Michael Walden asks a very good point about the six families which might come here from Syria.

If you take each family getting £20,000 benefits each over five years, the minimum will be £600,000 to £700,000. Where will the housing come from?

There are people like myself now selling my house to move out of the UK because, although we try to do things legally and pay fees to the UK, myself and thousands others cannot get our spouses/children here because they are non-European.

We would not receive any benefits from the UK taxpayer, unlike Europeans can for five years, and then there is the probability of spouse/children being sent back to their own country, which is happening now.

Ian Borrmann

Napier Close, Lynn