Letters: Jo Rust, December 23, 2016

Computer Graphic Image:

NEW SEA CEPTOR MISSILES TO BE DEVELOPED FOR ROYAL NAVY

The MoD has confirmed that a new Royal Navy missile defence system will be able to intercept and destroy enemy missiles travelling at supersonic speeds. 

The �483M contract to develop this cutting edge air-defence system - known as Sea Ceptor - is being awarded to UK industry. 

The system uses a new UK-developed missile capable of reaching speeds of up to Mach 3 and will have the ability to deal with multiple targets simultaneously, protecting an area of around 500 square miles over land or sea. 

Sea Ceptor will be developed under a demonstration contract with MBDA (UK) that is expected to last for five years. 

This contract will sustain around 500 jobs in MBDA and its supply chain, in key locations across the UK such as Stevenage, Filton and Lostock.

www.mbda-systems.com PPP-160410-133522001

Computer Graphic Image: NEW SEA CEPTOR MISSILES TO BE DEVELOPED FOR ROYAL NAVY The MoD has confirmed that a new Royal Navy missile defence system will be able to intercept and destroy enemy missiles travelling at supersonic speeds. The �483M contract to develop this cutting edge air-defence system - known as Sea Ceptor - is being awarded to UK industry. The system uses a new UK-developed missile capable of reaching speeds of up to Mach 3 and will have the ability to deal with multiple targets simultaneously, protecting an area of around 500 square miles over land or sea. Sea Ceptor will be developed under a demonstration contract with MBDA (UK) that is expected to last for five years. This contract will sustain around 500 jobs in MBDA and its supply chain, in key locations across the UK such as Stevenage, Filton and Lostock. www.mbda-systems.com PPP-160410-133522001

2
Have your say

The UK exports £7.7 billion of weaponry every year.

This includes to countries that have questionable human rights records, including Saudi Arabia, our “allies”.

The United Nations estimates that, of the 4,000 civilian deaths, at least 60 per cent of these have come from air strikes by the Saudi-led coalition.

The UK government is allowing the export of military equipment under a form of licence called Open Individual Export Licences. They reduce the transparency of our exports.

So, the question is, how much do our arms exports contribute to the displacement of whole communities because of war? And, if the case is that they do, isn’t it incumbent on us to accept refugees whose lives have been destroyed because of it?

Jo Rust

Gayton Road, Gaywood