Letters: John Maiden, December 4, 2015

Visitors Guide - Hunstanton''Hunstanton Beach ''Town Centre''Esplande Gardens''The Pier''Old Hunstanton Cliff ENGANL00120130602095532

Visitors Guide - Hunstanton''Hunstanton Beach ''Town Centre''Esplande Gardens''The Pier''Old Hunstanton Cliff ENGANL00120130602095532

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Whenever a letter to the Editor appears without a name or address it leaves me wondering if the author fully understands the topic under discussion.

This was certainly the case on Friday, November 20, when an unknown writer suggested the reason for building a large housing estate south of Hunstanton was because the land is not good for crops. The facts do not support this theory, because this was productive arable farmland prior to being acquired by Searles Leisure Resort and converted into three golf courses and 155 plots for holiday lodges, all of which are located in Heacham.

The letter writer fails to acknowledge that land east of the A149 is still producing crops on exactly the same type of soil as land to the west, which has deliberately been uncultivated for the past decade, presumably in an attempt to show it is not good enough for growing crops. The presence of a former chalk pit east of the A149 close to the top of Redgate Hill does not disprove the existence of a carrstone layer further down the hillside. One has to look no further than our magnificent cliffs to see how the depth of the white chalk varies from several feet in the north to a few inches in the south.

In its capacity as the Minerals and Waste Authority, Norfolk County Council confirmed the presence of carrstone, as well as sand and shingle, over one hectare of the Hopkins Homes site. And according to the Detailed Policies and Sites Plan for West Norfolk, this would require extraction before any development could commence. Apparently this policy has been abandoned, along with the carrstone itself, casting serious doubt on the sustainability of building 166 new dwellings on Redgate Hill.

John Maiden, Heacham