Letters: Jon Seymour, June 20, 2017

Fire crews attended an incident in Billingford yesterday.
Fire crews attended an incident in Billingford yesterday.

When I switched on the television last week to see if there were any updates on the tragedy that befell London in the early hours of the morning, I had to change channel after a few minutes.

It wasn’t the horror of what was happening that made me switch off, it was the media’s coverage of the event that I found sickening. I’m one of those that doesn’t go in for sensationalism, preferring facts above all else.

On the television, there were reporters and cameramen at the police cordon interviewing people. Now by all means interview any victims who were inside the building and had managed to get out, 
because they will need to talk to someone, regardless of who it is. What I found enraging was a reporter asking people who were frantically searching for missing friends or relatives, asking who they’re looking for then shoving a microphone in their faces. It can’t be just me that thought this was wrong? People in the grip of panic, fearing for the safety of their loved ones, being pestered by the media, when all they want is answers?

As someone that contributes regularly to the Lynn News, I can’t help feeling that some of that “being tarred with the same brush” might rub off from these parasites that feed off the negative emotions. It’s for this reason that I enjoy reading the Lynn News and working alongside them. The team of staff at the newspaper don’t want sensational stories, but they will allow people to speak out if they want to.

Of course tragedies happen on a regular basis, but it’s the sensitivity in the way it’s reported that makes all the difference. Sensitivity over sensation seems to be the norm with the local media, in my opinion at least.