Home   Lifestyle   Article

Subscribe Now

Sandringham to Wolferton 1952 King George VI funeral procession to King’s Lynn station





The Lynn News is looking back 70 years to a sad day when King George VI died at the Sandringham royal estate on Wednesday, February 6, 1952. This is part eight ...

Thousands of people waited patiently in the morning sunshine, filling the rhododendron-lined lanes from Sandringham to Wolferton, as the funeral procession made its way to the royal station on Monday, February 11.

Waiting there was the funeral train, with two Lynn men – driver George Hill and fireman E Edge – the crew of the 4-6-0 engine “Ford Castle” who would be in charge of the journey to King’s Lynn. At 12.18pm they pulled into Lynn and watchers glimpsed the bowed heads of the Queen and Princess Margaret, and the pale anxious face of the Queen Mother.

The King’s coffin lay in Sandringham church until Monday, February 11, when it was carried in procession to Wolferton railway station, with hundreds of local people among those lining the route.
The King’s coffin lay in Sandringham church until Monday, February 11, when it was carried in procession to Wolferton railway station, with hundreds of local people among those lining the route.

Railway officials worked swiftly and one of British Railways’ newest express passenger locomotives, the Pacific “Britannia” from the East Anglian route, with driver G Harding and fireman S Tearman aboard, was backed on to the train.

At 12.25pm the signal was given and the train steamed slowly away on its 100-mile journey to the capital. Just 15 minutes later about 200 people saw it pass through Downham station at about 50mph on its way to King’s Cross railway station.

Another formal procession followed as the coffin was taken to Westminster Hall, where the King lay in state for three days before the funeral was held on Friday, February 15 at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More