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£3.8 million green heat project begins at King's Lynn council depot




Work has begun on a multi-million pound project to install greener heating systems at several publicly-owned sites in West Norfolk.

Bore holes, each nearly 200 metres deep, are being drilled into the ground at the borough council depot on Lynn’s Hardwick industrial estate, to enable the use of ground source heat pumps there.

And similar work is expected to begin at other sites, including Lynnsport, the South Lynn Community Centre and the Oasis centre in Hunstanton over the coming weeks.

At the Council Depot are (LtoR) John Psaila, construction manager for Finn Geotherm, Cllr Paul Kunes and Robert Wiseman, Borough Council energy efficiency and greenspace officer.. (47535913)
At the Council Depot are (LtoR) John Psaila, construction manager for Finn Geotherm, Cllr Paul Kunes and Robert Wiseman, Borough Council energy efficiency and greenspace officer.. (47535913)

Officials estimate the project, which is being funded through government decarbonisation grants worth around £3.85 million, will reduce the council’s carbon footprint by nearly 500 tonnes a year once it is complete.

Paul Kunes, the authority’s cabinet member responsible for carbon reduction, said this week: “This is really exciting news and means a very big step forward in the council’s aim to become carbon neutral as soon as possible.”

The authority is also planning to install solar panels on buildings over the coming months.

Drilling has begun to make the council depot greener.. (47535878)
Drilling has begun to make the council depot greener.. (47535878)

Although the council set out a new policy on tackling climate change last autumn, it has been repeatedly criticised by environmental campaigners over its reluctance to formally declare a climate emergency, despite several attempts led by opposition members.

But Mr Kunes believes the project shows the council is showing the way forward on the issue.

He added: “We want to take a lead on this initiative for others to follow.

“By using a renewable resource to generate heat this helps to save carbon that would usually be emitted by burning gas or oil.

“Ultimately, switching to a renewable heating system allows for a reduction in the council’s carbon footprint, especially when coupled with renewable electricity generation from solar panels which will also be installed by the end of September.”



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