Home   News   Article

Activists’ art to highlight environment and wildlife losses




An outdoor art gallery has been installed at the proposed Parkway development in Lynn to highlight the potential losses to the environment and wildlife.

The gallery was set up by the climate activist group Extinction Rebellion King’s Lynn and West Norfolk and other environmentalists.

They say they want to highlight the threat of destruction of an important community space the size of 16 football pitches, which has scrub, mature trees and reedbed, and is home to breeding birds and endangered species.

Residents near The Rookery protesting about new houses that are to built. (42045013)
Residents near The Rookery protesting about new houses that are to built. (42045013)

West Norfolk Council’s plans for the £85m development with up to 380 homes would bridge the Fairstead and Gaywood estates and ease congestion by providing a new access to Hardwick Industrial Estate. The council claims the eco-friendliness of the homes would be better than anywhere else in the country for a similar project.

Organisers of the gallery, installed on Saturday, said: “We appreciate that housing is important, but an area with this much value to the local community and to the health of the planet must be protected.

“We urge the council to reconsider this site and revisit other locations that could support just as many houses without harming the wellbeing of local people and wildlife.”

Residents near The Rookery protesting about new houses that are to built. (42045011)
Residents near The Rookery protesting about new houses that are to built. (42045011)

Local activist Jenny Walker said the loss of “beautiful” trees - some 150 years old - and the “amazing” reedbed, which are less than two miles from the town centre, must be highlighted.

“We have hung prayer flags in trees and pictures and posters on railings,” she said. “Some pictures do not need words to give a sense of the passion we feel that this place is too precious to lose.”

West Norfolk councillor Peter Gidney is overseeing the project.

He said consultation had been undertaken as part of the planning process and tree planting at Congham is proposed as a mitigation measure.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More