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Campaigners in West Norfolk demand climate change action




Environmental campaigners have called for West Norfolk’s political leaders to act now against what they warn is “an unprecedented global emergency” on climate change.

More than 100 people have signed a submission to the public consultation on the borough council’s local plan for development in the area up to 2036.

And they have formally urged the authority to form a community partnership to co-ordinate local action.

A city showing the effect of Climate Change. (6001096)
A city showing the effect of Climate Change. (6001096)

The submission by the King’s Lynn Climate Concern group follows a recent surge in public awareness of the threat of climate change.

This week, MPs in Westminster passed a motion declaring a climate emergency, though it is not binding on the government.

That followed almost two weeks of protests in the capital by Extinction Rebellion activists.

The group’s submission argues that current projections for a four degree rise in global temperatures by the end of the century are “widely considered incompatible with organised human society.”

It continues: “When children born in Norfolk today are in their 80s, there may be no civilisation left to speak of.

“We request that the council recognises the urgency of the situation we are in with regard to climate change and biodiversity loss. We ask that all current and future policies have this recognition at their heart.

“The plan needs to commit to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and detail how the borough will adapt to the consequences of changes in climate that we are already locked into.”

The council has said submissions made during the consultation, which closed on Monday, will be reviewed within the process of preparing a second draft of the plan.

A second round of consultations on the revised plan is expected to take place either later this year or early in 2020.



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