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It's beginning to look a bit like Autumnwatch at Wild Ken Hill, Snettisham



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Autumn has very much arrived at Wild Ken Hill in Snettisham, along with the presenters of BBC Autumnwatch Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan.

A huge technical operation lies behind the television programme we watch in the comfort of our armchairs, which runs from tonight until Friday at 8pm.

Both presenters attended a production meeting while a large team of technical personnel, security and bodyguards worked like busy bees to begin the filming process, which is beamed back to Bristol and onto our telly-boxes.

WIld Ken Hill, BBC Autumnwatch presenters Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan. Picture credit: Andrew Waddison AW PR (52637037)
WIld Ken Hill, BBC Autumnwatch presenters Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan. Picture credit: Andrew Waddison AW PR (52637037)

The running of the production is overseen by Lee Rich, engineering manager. He said: "I make sure all the technical kit arrives on site and works.

"Excitingly this season the hydrogen generation system will be used which means the power source is green from start to finish."

Lucy Hodson, aka Lucy Lapwing, draws visual boards to engage the viewers and explain ecosystems.

Lucy Hodson prepares visual boards for the viewers showing the ecosystem of the beavers at Wild Ken Hill. (52617691)
Lucy Hodson prepares visual boards for the viewers showing the ecosystem of the beavers at Wild Ken Hill. (52617691)

Meeting presenters Chris and Michaela was a real pleasure after watching them when I was younger on The Really Wild Show.

Even though the issue of climate change is in the spotlight, more importantly the presenters had a healthy debate about what is best on the BBC catering menu while they stay for the four days filming in Snettisham. The discussion turned in to a great West Norfolk cake -off.

Chris who is vegan said: "It has to be the lemon drizzle cake, I love a bit of zest, it's right up there."

Michaela Strachan and Chris Packham return to Wild Ken Hill for BBC Autumnwatch and chat to Lynn News reporter Jenny Beake. PIcture credit: AW PR (52618191)
Michaela Strachan and Chris Packham return to Wild Ken Hill for BBC Autumnwatch and chat to Lynn News reporter Jenny Beake. PIcture credit: AW PR (52618191)

While Michaela, a vegetarian, said: "For me it's the home-made Chelsea buns."

With the serious cake debate covered, the topic of climate change cropped up and ways in which as a society we can make small lifestyle changes to help the crisis we are in.

Chris said: "We have the solutions and tool kit and this showed during the pandemic that when we have to make significant change we can. Now with this climate threat we must be compelled to act.

Wild Ken Hill is setting up as a BBC studio for Autumnwatch. Picture credit:Andrew Waddison AW PR (52617640)
Wild Ken Hill is setting up as a BBC studio for Autumnwatch. Picture credit:Andrew Waddison AW PR (52617640)

"The pandemic created a hiatus where we haven't been able to focus on the important issues.

"Though Covid-19 is of course a threat and we are coming out of it, climate change is a bigger threat that is putting billions of people's lives at risk and this is why the COP26 conference is so important."

Michaela, who lives in South Africa, said: "The lockdowns gave us a new appreciation of nature in connecting and protecting the countryside. It is important that people remember what wild spaces did for them during the pandemic.

BBC Autumnwatch at Wild Ken Hill (52617680)
BBC Autumnwatch at Wild Ken Hill (52617680)

"It has shown we can change dramatically and quickly to avert the climate crisis.

"I am aware of the pledge for change and making small changes that can make a big difference. Giving up meat is a big thing which I did when I was 17.

"We all need to be aware and keep thinking about ideas that are obvious such as taking a plastic bag when you don't need one."

Michaela Strachan and Chris Packham return to Wild Ken Hill for BBC Autumnwatch and chat to Lynn News reporter Jenny Beake. PIcture credit: AW PR (52618197)
Michaela Strachan and Chris Packham return to Wild Ken Hill for BBC Autumnwatch and chat to Lynn News reporter Jenny Beake. PIcture credit: AW PR (52618197)

Chris said: "We are making progress such as with electric cars but the infrastructure doesn't support it, we need more chargers and supermarket car parks would be the place for chargers.

"Michaela is right I can change my practises and make improvements.

"We have a choice and ability to change our mind, humans are intelligent and adaptable but not good at changing our minds, but if we don't we'll be in trouble.

L to R Chris Packham and reporter Jenny Beake. Lynn News' charity of the year is the National Autistic Society and he gave some useful insight into the challenges this presents within the workplace. Picture credit: Andrew Waddison. (52621908)
L to R Chris Packham and reporter Jenny Beake. Lynn News' charity of the year is the National Autistic Society and he gave some useful insight into the challenges this presents within the workplace. Picture credit: Andrew Waddison. (52621908)

"We need to make a change. Even a monthly change like a lifestyle switch to a green energy company, look at journeys and using public transport, maybe eat no meat, or eating less meat but supporting local farmers and make it sustainable rather than shopping for meat that is shipped across the world which is just bonkers, and improving animal welfare."

Michaela said: "Not forgetting being kind and not criticising those changes and supporting those who are trying to improve."

The BBC Watches have followed the progress of Wild Ken Hill from the beginning of their rewilding and regenerative farming journey two years ago.

Wild Ken Hill: Picture Credit AW PR (52617671)
Wild Ken Hill: Picture Credit AW PR (52617671)

Chris said: "We all want to champion what's being done here at Wild Ken Hill, they're changing practises in land management, food production which is more sustainable and we are keen to champion their influence.

"They are brave in taking the lead and when things work out people will follow."

The presenter was picking seeds from the hedgerow that he will use to improve his wild flower patch and he said: "This is what a hedgerow should look like, covered in berries, billowing and thick with seeds and tangled.

A massive technical operation behind the scenes to capture the wildlife at Wild Ken Hill for BBC Autumnwatch. Picture credit: AW PR (52617674)
A massive technical operation behind the scenes to capture the wildlife at Wild Ken Hill for BBC Autumnwatch. Picture credit: AW PR (52617674)

"If all hedgerows looked like that it would be fantastic."



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