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Coronavirus: West Norfolk cases drop as big rise recorded in Breckland




Cases of coronavirus are continuing to fall in West Norfolk, despite a sharp rise in some neighbouring areas, according to latest figures.

Government data suggests the weekly infection rate here may be less than half of that recorded in three of the districts which border the borough.

And new figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) suggest a further fall in deaths from Covid-19 across all settings.

Coronavirus news.
Coronavirus news.

Figures for the seven days up to last Wednesday, March 24, showed there were 65 confirmed coronavirus cases in West Norfolk, down by 19, or nearly 23 per cent, on the previous week.

The borough's rolling infection rate stood at 42.9 cases per 100,000 people, which is around the national average.

Although West Norfolk's rate remains the second highest of any district in the county, it is less than half of that for neighbouring Breckland, whose ratio of 96.5 cases per 100,000 people followed an 85 per cent rise in weekly cases to 135.

To the west, in South Holland, case rates are around three times those of West Norfolk at 131.4 per 100,000 people and are still rising slowly, according to the figures.

The total in Fenland is around double that of West Norfolk, but cases are falling there.

Earlier today, ONS figures for the week ending March 19 showed there had been two coronavirus-related deaths across all settings in West Norfolk - down from three the previous week and seven the week before that.

One of the deaths occurred in hospital, while the other was in a care home.

No new fatalities were recorded at Lynn's Queen Elizabeth Hospital in today's update from NHS England.

However, two further deaths have been recorded in recent days, taking the overall total since the start of the pandemic to 475.

The tables suggest the most recent fatality recorded was on Sunday, March 21.



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