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Demonstration against domestic violence at photo exhibition in King's Lynn




The poignant timing of the Pandora Project's exhibition showing imagery of life after domestic abuse, captured by Fakenham-based artist Keith Osborn was noted by many who attended.

Its opening coincided with the sentencing of Sarah Everard's murderer bringing the realities of violence against women and girls to the forefront of national conscience.

Independent borough councillor Jo Rust led an early evening march in solidarity with the #walkwithwomen and #reclaimthesestreets campaigns, who gathered outside St Nicholas Chapel in Lynn, where the exhibition was held.

Councillor Jo Rust led an early evening walk in light of the recent Sarah Everard case. (51819036)
Councillor Jo Rust led an early evening walk in light of the recent Sarah Everard case. (51819036)

The group of 10 men and women and children held placards saying 'for Sarah Everard and everyone, finish the walk' and 'all we are left with is dead women and rage'.

Representing Lady Dannett, Lord Lieutenant Nicholas Pratt officially opened the weekend exhibition, which is free to the public Saturday and Sunday between 10am and 3pm and organised by the Lynn-based Pandora Project charity.

He said: "Lady Dannett was not able to be here at a cause that is close to her heart. Representing Her Majesty the Queen is acknowledgement and recognition of the work Pandora does in this county. I must congratulate Keith on the quality and expertise of this photographic exhibition.

The Free as a Bird photography exhibition at St Nicholas Chapel by Keith Osborne in collaboration with the Pandora Project. (51819033)
The Free as a Bird photography exhibition at St Nicholas Chapel by Keith Osborne in collaboration with the Pandora Project. (51819033)

"I hope these photos have a significant impact on those that view them and the message behind the photos.

"Pandora gives real concrete help and a person's life can be significantly changed for the better.

"I fully support the work Pandora are doing and I hope the exhibition will be widely received and studied and that it gets a lot of visitors.

"Like everybody, this week's events has brought violence against women in to the spotlight and hit the nation very hard.

"Being on the same day the issue of violence against women is very much in the spotlight, not just the Sarah Everard case."

Mr Osborn said: "The exhibition came about as I saw Pandora on social media and the statistics showing the increased reports of domestic violence during lockdown. I contacted the charity to see how I could help and the photography is the result of that discussion."

"The wording and quotes are from domestic abuse survivors and for their safety and anonymity I couldn't photograph them in person so we used models. But to have integrity and the need to be real, that was important to me. I can't abide violence and abuse."

Elaine, a support worker with the Pandora Project, said: "Visitors will see the journey in the photos from the beginning and the freedom at the end of it.

"We hope to open people's eyes that we are here, there is a way through it, just reach out for support."

Model and child protection professional Naomi Harlow who was photographed said: "It was a great experience modelling for the charity and the positive message of life after abuse."

The free exhibition was held on Saturday and Sunday.



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