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Fairy magic on show at West Acre fair


By Lynn News Reporter


Izzy Freer and Jessica Cole enjoy a picnic with mums, Kim Cole and Vicky Freer (11289264)
Izzy Freer and Jessica Cole enjoy a picnic with mums, Kim Cole and Vicky Freer (11289264)

Eighty volunteers, who came from as far away as the West Country and the Midlands entertained hundreds of families during a Fairy Fair in Bradmoor Wood, near West Acre, at the weekend.

To do so they had to dress up with colourful flowers and wings at the two day event, which was organised by the Fairyland Trust.

Even the odd drop of rain could not dampen the obvious pleasure of the many children tugging at their parents’ hands as they scampered from attraction to attraction.

The Fairyland Trust is a Norfolk-based conservation charity formed to help engage children, mainly aged from three to eight, with the natural world.

This was the 21st annual fair, which travels to different venues around Norfolk, and aims to create enchanting events that introduce children to nature.

Mabel Joyce and Robin Judd make butterflies (11289272)
Mabel Joyce and Robin Judd make butterflies (11289272)
Rudi Brooks has her face painted (11289268)
Rudi Brooks has her face painted (11289268)

Although the Fairy Fairs are a strictly Norfolk event, the charity’s workshops also travel the length and breadth of the country to introduce even more children to the delights of the country’s flora and fauna.

Abbie Panks, a member of the trust’s management team, said: “For example, we are making fairy gardens. But what they are really learning about is wild flowers.

“Or if they are making magic wings they are learning about native butterflies or moths and magic wands help them learn about trees.”

A Fairyland Trust volunteer serves Abbie Panks in the Good Elf Bar at the Fairy Fair (11289258)
A Fairyland Trust volunteer serves Abbie Panks in the Good Elf Bar at the Fairy Fair (11289258)
Ramona Blatch rests on a mushroom carved by wood sculptor, Tim Atkins (11289284)
Ramona Blatch rests on a mushroom carved by wood sculptor, Tim Atkins (11289284)

The aim is to get children interested in nature at an early age in the hope that their interest will continue as they grow older.

Already more than 150,000 have attended the fairs which offer scores of exciting things to do and watch.

This weekend, amongst many activities, children could make a fairy house from natural materials, join Stripey the Caterpillar by becoming one of his many pairs of legs, take part in a fancy dress competition, make fairy flowers or bug jewellery, be enchanted by the skill and magic of entertainer, Mr Alexander, or simply get their face painted.

Mr Alexander entertains (11289276)
Mr Alexander entertains (11289276)
Wild Flower fairies, Daisy and Poppy,dance in the rain(11289280)
Wild Flower fairies, Daisy and Poppy,dance in the rain(11289280)

They could also listen to storytellers weaving magical tales in a storytellers’ hut or enter a music tent to be entertained by live bands.

And, to cap it all, youngsters could follow the Rainbow Trail through the woods to meet the Fairy King and Queen in their magic tent, afterwards leaving a message for the fairies in a special message tree.

Ms Panks said: “I delight in seeing children with huge grins on their faces.And it’s not just the children, it’s their parents - they’re all having a great time, too.

“They just forget themselves for a day and immerse themselves in the experience.”



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