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Fakenham artist's painting in global online exhibition of mask artworks




A Fakenham artist has said she is “thrilled” to have been invited to take part in an online international exhibition of mask artworks.

Terri Broughton, who has been painting for just over a year, was one of 250 artists representing 120 countries selected for the UNESCO Beirut and MEADOWS Mask Art - Creativity under Lockdown online exhibition.

Terri, who is a former King’s Lynn Academy headteacher, submitted a piece showing two children looking at each other wearing gas masks, which was produced before the coronavirus pandemic.

Artwork by Terri Broughton. Picture: SUBMITTED. (36244381)
Artwork by Terri Broughton. Picture: SUBMITTED. (36244381)

Terri said: “I was thrilled to be invited to take part in the UNESCO MEADOWS Mask Art exhibition. It is such a great cause and it was a privilege to be selected.”

She hopes the exhibition, which shows the artworks on masks, will raise awareness of its aims, to “build peace through international cooperation in education, the sciences and culture”.

On their website, UNESCO officials said: “This world-class event aims to advance global social responsibility awareness by encouraging people to wear masks, not as an obligation but out of conviction, that it is one of the best measures of protecting one another from the risks of infecting others.

Artwork by Terri Broughton. Picture: SUBMITTED. (36244383)
Artwork by Terri Broughton. Picture: SUBMITTED. (36244383)

“In the future, if these masks are realised with the imprint of these international artists, they would even carry the message further and transform the experience of wearing a bland monochromatic mask into a more colourful and hopeful experience.”

Terri’s artworks of people wearing gas masks were banned from an exhibition at Pensthorpe Natural Park last year after officials said they felt some of the work “may have been inappropriate for some of our young family visitors”.

Terri, who has now submitted one of these pieces for the UNESCO and MEADOWS exhibition, said: “I saw the mask as protection, incubation, safety, a safe place to be, a choice etc.”

Artwork by Terri Broughton. Picture: SUBMITTED. (36244387)
Artwork by Terri Broughton. Picture: SUBMITTED. (36244387)

She added: “Currently the mask is seen as a protection against a virus, protecting from infection from and to others.”

Terri has since been invited to submit work to the JARFO Kyoto Gallery in Japan for another online mask exhibition, and they have selected a piece called Three Little Birds, which shows a young girl wearing a gas mask.

She said, as an artist, she has found lockdown “encouraging”.

“I have had so much more time to create pieces of work and experiment without a deadline,” Terri added.

Artwork by Terri Broughton. Picture: SUBMITTED. (36244385)
Artwork by Terri Broughton. Picture: SUBMITTED. (36244385)

“I am being approached by galleries at the moment from across the globe and this has come as a complete surprise to me.

“I cannot ever visualise a time when I will not be painting now. It feels like taking a large lung full of fresh air.”

You can view more of Terri’s art on her website at terribroughtonart.co.uk.



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