Home   News   Article

Families uncover Hidden Heritage of Gaywood River




Bird and Wildlife Activities at Gaywood River. Pictured Back Row FLtoR Lizzie Eakwaker.Rebecca Banks.Ursula Mudge.Ursula Guta. Front FLtoR Isabella McAdam. Seven Year Old Joanna Lockwood.
Bird and Wildlife Activities at Gaywood River. Pictured Back Row FLtoR Lizzie Eakwaker.Rebecca Banks.Ursula Mudge.Ursula Guta. Front FLtoR Isabella McAdam. Seven Year Old Joanna Lockwood.

Families enjoyed an afternoon exploring the Hidden Heritage of a river in West Norfolk last week during free wildlife events.

People of all ages were invited to find out more about Gaywood River at the Hidden Heritage events, which were led by the Norfolk Rivers Trust and Norfolk Wildlife Trust.

Bird and Wildlife Activities at Gaywood River. Pictured Far Right Isabella McAdam (Norfolk Wildlife Trust) with Children and Parents building Bird Boxes.
Bird and Wildlife Activities at Gaywood River. Pictured Far Right Isabella McAdam (Norfolk Wildlife Trust) with Children and Parents building Bird Boxes.

Participants learnt about the wildlife that lives in the river and about the birds that live around it.

Senior education officer at Norfolk Wildlife Trust, Annabel Hill, said: “The Norfolk Wildlife Trust education team had a fantastic day celebrating the wildlife of the Gaywood River with many local families.”

She said the group built bird boxes and identified birds along the river, adding: “The event also helped people to recognise the birds they may see in their gardens.

“Children also enjoyed exploring why river habitats are so important for wildlife. Rivers are well known for supporting species such as otters and kingfishers but there are many others which are perhaps less well known.

Bird and Wildlife Activities at Gaywood River. Pictured FLtoR Alissa Howel. Isabelle Mudge (Norfolk Wildlife Trust) Kydon with their Bird Box.
Bird and Wildlife Activities at Gaywood River. Pictured FLtoR Alissa Howel. Isabelle Mudge (Norfolk Wildlife Trust) Kydon with their Bird Box.

“Daubenton’s bats are usually seen feeding over water and flowering plants along the river edge are great for bees.”

Ms Hill added there are further sessions scheduled at Gaywood River, including one today at 10.30am: “There are more sessions planned every Friday in the school holidays until August 3. On April 13 we’ll be learning all about brilliant bats, and on June 1 about buzzing bees. It’s all free so come and join us.

“Meet us at 10.30am on the bridge behind Strikes. Learn more about your river, how important it is for wildlife and how you can help.”

Hidden Heritage of the Gaywood River is a £210,000 project to enhance a former landfill site at Lynnsport, made possible by a National Lottery grant of nearly £94,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Bird and Wildlife Activities at Gaywood River. Pictured FLtoR Eva Marshall.Lucas Marshall. Rebecca Banks (Norfolk River Trus)
Bird and Wildlife Activities at Gaywood River. Pictured FLtoR Eva Marshall.Lucas Marshall. Rebecca Banks (Norfolk River Trus)

The remaining costs will be met by West Norfolk Council, Norfolk Rivers Trust and the Environment Agency.

Bird and Wildlife Activities at Gaywood River. Pictured LtoR Joanna Lockwood. Ursula Guta (Norfolk Rivers Trust)
Bird and Wildlife Activities at Gaywood River. Pictured LtoR Joanna Lockwood. Ursula Guta (Norfolk Rivers Trust)


This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More