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Norfolk County Council says roadside grass and weeds around Watlington will be cut next week





Work to cut down high weeds around a West Norfolk village will start next week amid worries that poor visibility could result in a serious crash.

Yesterday, we reported that a worried driver has been left fearing for the worst after overgrown foliage contributed to her being involved in a car crash.

Alison Rankin, 55, was forced to edge out from a junction onto Lynn Road in Watlington - near the village hall - because lengthy weeds were blocking her view.

Alison Rankin's view onto Lynn Road in Watlington was obstructed by the four-foot high nettles - but they could be cut next week
Alison Rankin's view onto Lynn Road in Watlington was obstructed by the four-foot high nettles - but they could be cut next week

Unable to see past the four-feet high nettles, she was struck by an approaching vehicle - leading to her car being written off.

Terrington St Clement residents have also voiced frustrations about overgrown verges along the A17 in recent weeks - although these have now been trimmed down.

Norfolk County Council is responsible for maintaining grass verges, roadside weeds and trees growing on adopted highway verges.

Now, a spokesperson from the council has said: “We can confirm the verges on the A17 were cut last week.

“The roads around Watlington are due to be cut the week commencing June 3, 2024. This is part of our normal grass cutting schedules that are followed every year.

“We cut roadside verges for road safety purposes and to maintain visibility at junctions and to provide room for people to walk on the pavement.”

The cutting due to take place around Watlington will be a one swathe width cut, with the visibility splays at the highway junction also scheduled to be trimmed.

This work is carried out once a year, with a further cut of visibility splays carried out at the end of the summer.

The county council has two grass cutting schedules for our highways - one for roads in urban areas and another for rural roads.

Highways crews cut grass verges along the majority of Norfolk's roads between May and September each year. Public rights of way are dealt with separately.

Ms Rankin had voiced worries that “up until someone gets killed there, they are not going to do anything”.

However, her concerns may have been somewhat eased with the news that the weeds could be cut as early as next week.



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