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Naked in Norfolk in Hunstanton reopens after lockdown 2



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The opening of an art gallery and crafts shop in Hunstanton has been a positive step for its proprietor whose world was rocked by the tragic loss of her son last year.

Jacqueline Kitch lost her son, Josh, aged 30, in Spain following a car accident. She and her family were devastated and she gave up her job as she struggled to cope with what had happened.

She said: "I felt that I had lost the plot. I started taking photographs around the Norfolk coast and I had a vision that I would be arriving at this little shop in the town, which has now come true.

Jacqueline Kitch, pictured with her husband Graham, in her Hunstanton shop and gallery, Naked in Norfolk.
Jacqueline Kitch, pictured with her husband Graham, in her Hunstanton shop and gallery, Naked in Norfolk.

"I am a budding photographer, and this shop has come as a complete change of direction for me. I used to work in the hospitality sector and travel around the country."

Jacqueline opened Naked in Norfolk at 68 Westgate, on October 1, which she says is about viewing Norfolk with the naked eye.

"My husband and my daughter encouraged me to open the shop as they thought it would be good for me."

Naked in Norfolk in Westgate pictured glowing with lights at dusk.
Naked in Norfolk in Westgate pictured glowing with lights at dusk.

Jacqueline promotes the work of Norfolk craftspeople, photographers and artists, including those from the West Norfolk Artists' Association.

She started off with affordable art where the maximum price tag was £100 but now she has added a Naked Contemporists' section where prices range from £100 to £250.

"There are no two pieces the same. It's all original art, crafts, photography and quirky goods," she said.

This photograph of Holme was taken by Jacqueline.
This photograph of Holme was taken by Jacqueline.

She took the decision to open the gallery knowing that times during the pandemic were difficult for small businesses. November was particularly tough, she said. "I knew I was taking a chance and I was aware of the implications, but I still decided to do it.

"The support from local people has been great. People have been popping in and having a chat. It's a wonderful community here.

"I don't think it's fair that the some of the 'big boys' in retail have been allowed to open selling items such as small businesses do. And these small businesses have had to shut down."

Jacqueline reopened her gallery this week and has also just set up a new online store.



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