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Hardings Way a hot topic in King's Lynn transport talks




Dozens of people joined together at the weekend to once again protest the possibility of a Lynn bus and cycle lane being opened up to general traffic.

Saturday’s protest, which saw a number of cyclists, along with a Penny Farthing, gather at Hardings Way, came days ahead of a discussion on King’s Lynn Transport Strategy.

The discussion was held during West Norfolk Council’s cabinet meeting on Tuesday, where councillors also debated two motions on Hardings Way – one to review work planned for the site and the other to create a report detailing all aspects of Hardings Way.

Hardings Way Bus and Cycle Lane Protest at the Wisbech Road Bus Gate near the junction with Wisbech Road, South Lynn. (28210492)
Hardings Way Bus and Cycle Lane Protest at the Wisbech Road Bus Gate near the junction with Wisbech Road, South Lynn. (28210492)

Peter Gidney, cabinet member for project delivery, said decisions must be made based on research, and added that at present, the town undergoes “a lot of investigation to try and improve transport routes to benefit the community”.

“Those options are put together before the council in the usual way,” he said.

“We need to do this and we have a process, we can’t avoid the process.”

Hardings Way Bus and Cycle Lane Protest at the Wisbech Road Bus Gate near the junction with Wisbech Road, South Lynn ..Brian Cobbold riding his Penny Farthing at the event. (28210757)
Hardings Way Bus and Cycle Lane Protest at the Wisbech Road Bus Gate near the junction with Wisbech Road, South Lynn ..Brian Cobbold riding his Penny Farthing at the event. (28210757)

Councillor Alexandra Kemp, who represents South Lynn and who put forward one of the motions, said: “To deal with climate change we need more bus lanes.”

She added: “We want to make sure we have people using buses.”

Councillor Francis Bone, who represents St Margarets with St Nicholas Ward and who put forward the second motion, said opening up Hardings Way to all traffic would have a “detrimental impact” on people living in the Friars area, as it would “increase pollution” in that area.

Mr Gidney said Hardings Way was “just one part” of the options being assessed for transport routes in Lynn.

Graham Middleton, cabinet member for business development, said of the councillors, he lived closest to Hardings Way and had spoken with people who have opposing views on the bus and cycle route.

“I have spoken to my neighbours and there are those who say ‘we need to protect it’ but there are also a number of people who say ‘can’t something be done with that road’,” he said.

“I absolutely think we should look at all the possibilities.”

Cabinet members voted to reject the two motions.

The meeting also heard more about the King’s Lynn Transport Strategy from cabinet member for development, Richard Blunt.

Mr Blunt said the work for the strategy started in 2018, alongside Norfolk County Council and consulting with WSP, to allow for economic growth up to 2036.

He said there are currently 33 different options that need to be investigated, split into three categories, short-, medium- and long-term projects. Councillors raised points about the possibility for a park and ride, and for additional parking for those using the ferry.

Mr Blunt said: “I’m expecting this document to grow over the years. It will have to change as technology changes.”

Cabinet members voted to adopt the King’s Lynn Transport Strategy implementation plan.


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