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King Charles III England Coastal Path sections from Hunstanton to Sutton Bridge and Skegness to open this year





There are high hopes for a tourism boost as a result of a new stretch of a coastal walk – due to open this year.

The King Charles III England Coast Path section from Hunstanton to Sutton Bridge – and on to Skegness – has been ‘approved in whole but not open yet’ with ‘works planned or in progress’.

Natural England has begun to investigate how to improve coastal access along the 53km stretch so that the landscape can be enjoyed by more people.

King Charles III England Coast Path National Trail - Stretch Progress. PHOTO: NATURAL ENGLAND
King Charles III England Coast Path National Trail - Stretch Progress. PHOTO: NATURAL ENGLAND

Neil Constable, programme manager of the King Charles III England Coast Path at Natural England, said: “Natural England is working to open two approved stretches of the King Charles III England Coast Path from Hunstanton to Sutton Bridge and Sutton Bridge to Skegness which are currently being established.

“It is anticipated that the former will open in spring 2024, while there is no confirmed date for the latter.

“Legal coastal access rights to the public will become available when the stretches have been officially launched.”

Coun Michael Booth
Coun Michael Booth

Once completed the path will 2,700 miles long.

But there are hopes that this walk – which was recently advertised by The Guardian national newspaper – will attract more tourists to Sutton Bridge.

Cllr Michael Booth, who represents the village on South Holland District Council, said: “It is a fabulous idea for people to get fit and get outdoors.

Hopes are high that walkers will be attracted to Sutton Bridge once the King Charles III Coastal Path is completed – Coun Michael Booth says the path can put Sutton Bridge on the map.
Hopes are high that walkers will be attracted to Sutton Bridge once the King Charles III Coastal Path is completed – Coun Michael Booth says the path can put Sutton Bridge on the map.

“Hopefully it will bring money to the area and bring people into a deprived area, which Sutton Bridge is.

“I think it is a brilliant thing and could put Sutton Bridge on the map.

“A lot of people will use the footpath and encourage people to get out.

“The parish council was a bit worried about the signage but I believe it is going to be a good thing for health and wellbeing.”

The route was originally known as the England Coast Path and is as a long distance trail that follows the coastline of England.

Sections 48 and 49 show the route from the seaside Norfolk town of Hunstanton travelling round The Wash to Sutton Bridge and further up the estuary to Skegness.

Work is now underway to prepare the new stretch of coast path for public use, which was approved by the Secretary of State in 2021 and 2022.

First steps were taken by contacting owners and occupiers of the affected land to discuss the design and location of any new infrastructure which is needed, such as signs and gates.

The coastal path aims to be completed by the end of this year with more than 1,000 miles of countryside being made reachable on foot.

Work to establish the routes is currently taking place and eventually walkers will be able to reach beaches and nature reserves in Lincolnshire.

Officers from Norfolk and Lincolnshire County Councils are providing Natural England with expert local advice and helping to make sure there is full consultation with local interests during the development of the route.

Information on the route:

From Lynn the route will head south to go up the Great Ouse estuary to cross at to West Lynn and then head downstream on the other side following the Peter Scott walk on the bank between West Lynn and Sutton Bridge. On its way it passes the lighthouse once owned by Sir Peter Scott near the mouth of the River Nene.

Heading further north the route will follow the estuaries of the River Welland and River Witham (Boston Haven) some distance upstream to cross at Fosdyke Bridge and Boston before reaching the open coast at Freiston.

It will cross a footbridge at the mouth of the River Steeping and pass through Gibraltar Point Nature Reserve onwards to reach Skegness Pier.

The easy-to-follow route will conform to National Trail standards and will create new access routes linking with the current network.

Visit https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/england-coast-path-overview-of-progress for further information.

What do you think of these coastal plans? Post your comments below.



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