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King's Lynn charity's nurse keyrings say thank you to town's hospital



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A Lynn charity has supported the town's hospital after one of its beneficiaries knitted doll keyrings in a variety of uniforms to thank them for their work.

The Bridge for Heroes, which provides out-reach support to the service veteran community, decided it would do something special to support the Queen Elizabeth Hospital and enlisted the help of beneficiary Anne Johnson, who has been in isolation since the start of lockdown.

To keep busy during the coronavirus lockdown, Anne has continued her support for the Bridge for Heroes by knitting small keyring dolls of service personnel, all in the appropriate service uniform, for sale on the charity’s online shop.

Bridge for Heroes representatives present knitted keyrings to Lynn's QEH. From left, Mike Taylor, Bridge for Heroes CEO, Laura Skaife-Knight, deputy chief executive at the QEH, John Ringer, Bridge for Heroes safe systems manager and Gary Walker, volunteer support. Picture: SUBMITTED.
Bridge for Heroes representatives present knitted keyrings to Lynn's QEH. From left, Mike Taylor, Bridge for Heroes CEO, Laura Skaife-Knight, deputy chief executive at the QEH, John Ringer, Bridge for Heroes safe systems manager and Gary Walker, volunteer support. Picture: SUBMITTED.

It was after she had knitted the keyrings for the Bridge for Heroes that the idea to create some specially for the QEH came about.

Anne was commissioned to knit a number of dolls, all in various nursing uniforms but wearing PPE, for keyrings to give to the QEH, which she quickly set about doing.

Mike Taylor, CEO of the Bridge for Heroes, said: “Although we have been kept very busy throughout the lockdown in supporting the centre’s beneficiaries, it was also important that, where possible, we kept them busy with various activities in which they could participate.

"In Anne’s case we encouraged her to continue knitting the dolls.

"Seeing some that she had made in nurses uniforms gave us the idea of having some specifically made for the staff at the QEH, who have done such a great job in looking after us throughout the pandemic”.

Representatives from the Bridge for Heroes presented the keyring dolls to Laura Skaife-Knight, the deputy chief executive of the QEH.

She said: “I’m very grateful to the team at the Bridge for Heroes, in particular to Anne Johnson, who did all the excellent knitting, for the effort they have gone to in showing their support for our staff.”

Earlier this month, the Bridge for Heroes was honoured with the Queen's Award for Voluntary Service – the highest award a voluntary group can receive in the UK.

The charity, which was set up just over 10 years ago, provides help and support to those in the veteran community most in need, many of whom were finding the adjustment from service life to that in the civilian community difficult to manage.

Since then, it has supported more than 1,000 veterans in a variety of ways, from dealing with housing and benefit issues, to supporting those struggling with mental health problems.

During the Covid-19 pandemic, the Bridge for Heroes has reconfigured from a 'drop-in' to an 'out-reach' service.

To find out more about the Bridge for Heroes, visit www.thebridgeforheroes.org.



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