Home   News   Article

King's Lynn soldier's poignant note revealed on 10th anniversary of his death




The widow of a Lynn soldier who was killed 10 years ago today has revealed the poignant note he wrote shortly before his death.

Corporal Lee Scott, who was 26, died following an explosion in Afghanistan on July 10, 2009.

His widow Nikki set up what has become a leading national charity to support the families of service personnel killed in action in his memory.

Corporal Lee Scott, who was killed in action in Afghanistan 10 years ago this week (13634333)
Corporal Lee Scott, who was killed in action in Afghanistan 10 years ago this week (13634333)

And she has now revealed what she believes were the moving last words he wrote in a notebook before his death.

In a video released to mark the anniversary, she said: “I’ve looked through his book so many times but this time I saw a scribbled message on the very last page that he wrote on.

“It reads, ‘we will make life better.’

“I feel like Lee’s message is ‘keep going - this is what life is about.’”

Following Lee’s death, Nikki founded the charity Scotty’s Little Soldiers to support the children of fallen service personnel after discovering that no such support network existed.

Since its formation in 2010, the charity has helped hundreds of youngsters cope with the trauma of losing a loved one in the line of duty.

Last year, it was one of seven good causes to benefit from public donations made to celebrate the wedding of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

Nikki Scott, right, reflects on the 10th anniversary of her husband's death (13634335)
Nikki Scott, right, reflects on the 10th anniversary of her husband's death (13634335)

Nikki said she was proud of the support she received from the service community for the work of the charity, which emerged from her own children’s experiences.

She said: “Nine months after Lee was killed, my family said please come on holiday with us.

“Kai was laughing in the pool with his cousins and it was the first time he’d laughed since Lee’s death.

“When it first started it was mainly aimed at holidays so families could get away and not worry about the cost.

“The network and community have become as important, as when you lose a loved one serving in the military you are suddenly cut off from the [Armed Forces] community.”



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More