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New motorbike trial aims to crack down on speeding in rural Norfolk locations





A new eight-week police initiative is set to tackle speeding in hard-to-reach rural locations.

Norfolk Police has said it is demonstrating its commitment to the issue with the introduction of a motorbike trial.

Historically, officers or Safety Camera Team operators have found that positioning themselves safely – so they do not become an obstruction – in a village or a smaller country lane is almost impossible, which means they are unable to offer the speed checks in areas often requested by members of the public.

Norfolk Police is tackling speeding in rural, hard-to-reach locations with the introduction of a new motorbike trial. Picture: Norfolk Police
Norfolk Police is tackling speeding in rural, hard-to-reach locations with the introduction of a new motorbike trial. Picture: Norfolk Police

The team has identified more than 80 locations across the county that could be vulnerable to speeding which are not receiving the support needed because of this issue.

A new eight-week police bike initiative began earlier this month to try and combat the problem, allowing officers to get into locations that need attention.

Senior safety camera officer Malcolm Fitzsimmons said there had been a “really positive response” so far.

“People are happy to see that their complaints have been heard and something is being done about it,” he said.

“It’s been a challenge getting to this point, but we’re hoping that by increasing our presence in more rural areas, we’ll reduce the number of speeding reports we receive.

“Contrary to the opinions of some, we do not complete speed checks because they’re ‘cash cows’, and our aim is not to catch as many drivers as possible. Checks are done primarily to prevent further speeding and change the behaviour of offending drivers.”

Before enforcement, the Safety Camera Team deploy speed data recorders to monitor how many vehicles do not comply with the speed limit on a road.

Mr Fitzsimmons said: “Since the trial started on August 1 2023, we have visited that same location four times and recorded an average of four speeders per hour.

“Checks here wouldn’t have been possible before and shows our presence has likely had a significant impact in decreasing the number of speeders, and will hopefully continue to do so.

“Awareness of speeding is highly important and can save lives.

“This motorbike trial is giving us the opportunity to remind more people that speed limits exist everywhere, and they’re there for a reason.”



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